The Ankota Healthcare Delivery Management Blog

Older Adults Enjoy Better Relationships - FamilyConnect can help

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 30, 2010 5:56:00 AM

Recently published research in the June edition of Current Directions in Psychological Science concludes that Older Adults have better relationships with friends and their family.  The study, conducted by Purdue University shares the following:

  • Older Adults can better regulate their emotions and become upset less
  • Older adults report better marriages and more supportive friendships
  • There is a perception that older people have less time in a relationship, and therefore wish to make that remaining time as pleasant as possible

Current Directions in Psychological Science

More than attitude, it's about how all people interact, according to report author Karen Fingerman, professor of Gerontology, Developmental and Family Studies.  Picking up on this point, a concern is raised when the older person becomes less able to communicate effectively on their own.   If they desire to remain independent, there are solutions that assist with this task, such as home monitoring and Ankota's FamilyConnect.  FamilyConnect is a simple software product that allows care givers to report information to family members of someone under their care.  More information is available at our FamilyConnect page.

Ankota FamilyConnect

We're thrilled with the results of the research showing that Older Adults enjoy better relationships and we're glad that we can assist in the process.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Senior Demographics, Alzheimer's, Elderly Care, thought leadership, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care Technology

How will Home Care Change with Life Expectancies over 100?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 28, 2010 9:45:00 AM

Scientists in Denmark recently published a report in The Lancet indicating that half of babies born today in the developed world will live past 100 years of age.  There was a good deal of coverage of the report and you can choose your favorite news source below for more complete coverage.

Babies will live 100 years Bloomberg    Babies will live 100 Years - ABC News

 

Babies will live 100 years - BBC Babies will live 100 Years - Fox

I find this research to be extremely thought provoking.  Here are the top questions that come to mind for me:

  • How long will people be able to work if they live 100 years?  My understanding is that the retirement at age 65 was established at a time when average US live expectancy was 72.
  • Does a longer life mean a longer healthy and productive life?  Will a 90 year old person in 100 years have a comparable life to a 65 year old person today from the perspective of mobility, vision, etc.?
  • How will healthcare be paid for? We've all seen projections about how Medicare will run out of money in the not too distant future.  What will this mean?
  • Will we be able to cure Alheimer's by then? So far the cure to Alzheimer's has been elusive, but this projection would seem to raise the urgency to find a cure
  • Will this trend continue? Will the babies born in 100 years live to age 125?

If nothing else, this should convince us that we need to keep the innovation coming in the delivery of care.  Maybe it will stimulate our imaginations and accelerate our progress.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

Topics: Senior Demographics, Alzheimer's, Home Care Industry, Elderly Care, Care Coordination, thought leadership, Home Care Technology

Care Givers use Technology to Focus on what's Important - CLIENTS!

Posted by Marc Ottinger on Jun 24, 2010 11:20:00 AM

I attended the National Private Duty Association (NPDA) Annual Conference in Philadelphiain the spring.  One of the break-out sessions I attended was Veterans & Start Ups – Access Your Agency’s Potential, presented by Regina and Kelly McNamera of Always There Home Care in Southington CT. 

What impressed me the most was how the McNamera’s leveraged technology to focus their core competencies and as a result what is most important, their clients.  Some examples of what the McNameras do includes –

  • Outsourcing everything in the office except the intake of clients, e.g., payroll and even book keeping. 
  • Using a virtual receptionist that covers the phone 24/7 with a live person.  I contacted the company they use, MAP Communications.  Map Communications does such a great job training employees; I challenge anyone to say the receptionist on the phone is not an employee of Always There Home Care.
  • Giving Blackberrys to all their care givers, who appreciate the trust that is extended to them.  As a result there is a huge return on increased efficiency. 
  • Texting instead of phone calls has been an enormous time saver.  It is amazing how something so simple applied effectively can have such an impact. 

 NPDA

 But my favorite statement Kelly made in the presentation was, “Telephony helps keep me sane.”  I continue to be amazed at how private duty agencies can turn a blind eye to technology when it is technology that will allow them to do what they want to do most … care for the clients.  

Topics: Elderly Care, Home Care Best Practices, Home Care Technology, Home Care Mobile Solutions, NPDA

Home Care Software Geek Explains the Potential of the Cell Phone ?!?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 23, 2010 8:31:00 AM

The Home Care Software Geek posts in this blog don't talk about Home Care Nursing Software, Private Duty Telephony, DME Delivery Software, Home Infusion Care Management or the other topics we focus on regularly at Ankota.  Instead, these posts are intended to keep our readers up to date with technology trends that might be useful to your agencies, such as social media technologies, mobile devices, and what's happening from the big-boys like Microsoft, Google and Apple.

The home care software geek generally attempts to inform you about technology topics that you've heard of but might not understand.  The cell phone doesn't fall into that category, but that's because most of us are still thinking of it as a phone and not yet as a health care device, but that's changing.  My friend and colleague Dr. Eliot Heller MD was speaking to a group of health care entrepreneurs from France last week and made a point of mentioning that the one constant across his patient base in the Bronx was that they all have a cell phone.  Many of these low-income patients from Bronx-Lebanon hospital don't have home phones, but they all have cell phones.  In fact, Dr. Heller indicated that the cell phone number is more important and consistent for the hospital to track patients than their address.

Health care delivery efforts have taken notice and are starting to take advantage.  Here are some examples:

  • In the article Cellphone + EHR = Diabetis Management, two programs are designed which help inner city residents of Washington DC manage diabetis.  The applications allow people to record their weight, blood  glucose and blood pressure and they are given alerts on their phone screen if the values are out-of-range.  This initiative is expected to easily pay for itself by reducing hospitalization, and participants are given the cell phone.
  •  My friend Jacqueline Thong started a company called UBIQIHEALTH to help migraine sufferers.  UBIQIHEALTH chose to implement their technology on a cell phone, because everybody has one and because the nature of migraines is that you can get them under control better if you track when they happen and what triggered them.  Below is the content from their "How We Can Help" section of their website

UBIQIHEALTH

So why is this relevant for home care?  Perhaps the cell phone becomes an entry level TeleHealth unit that you can use to monitor your patients or clients at a very affordable price.  Remember Ankota's book of the year for 2009 was The Innovator's Prescription, by Clayton Christensen, and that one of his key messages is that that simple applications on devices available to more people often displace the more expensive devices.  You can see this explained by Clayton Christensen in a video, here.

Also, here at Ankota we've recognized the potential of the cell phone for home health aides to report their arrivals and departures.  As more and more cell phones are replaced with smart phones that can support simple applications and track GPS location, we expect that this will become a preferred option over telephony.  But, of course, we offer both and offer them interchangably (you can have some workers use telephoiny and others use their cell phone, and in fact you can even have a worker report their arrival on their phone and their departure on telephony (and vice versa).  Read more about Ankota's paperless work tracking solutions here.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Elderly Care, Health Care Reform, home care software geek, Home Care Technology

NIH Alzheimer's Care Guide: A Home Care Must Read

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 21, 2010 8:09:00 AM

One of our most popular posts on this blog was "Five Tips for Providing Better Alzheimer's Care" inspired by the work of and the Dr. Verna Carson-Bennerkeynote speech delivered by Dr. Verna Carson-Benner at the NAHC 5th Annual Private Duty Conference and Exhibition (PDHCA).  In this inspiring presentation, Dr. Carson Benner explained the stages of Alzheimer's in an easy to understand manner and shared tips on providing better care using analogies from caring for children.  Her moving presentation made a great impact based on its content alone, and in addition Dr. Carson-Benner shares her own passion.  In fact, she said that she was honored to be able to present at PDHCA, but that this is a topic she's so passionate about that she'd scream it from street corners.

For those of you who haven't been able to take advantage of one of Dr. Carson-Benner's classes on "How to Become an Alzheimer's Whisperer", the NIH has released a wonderful resource for providing care to a person with Alzheimer's.  It's easy to read, beautifully photographed and free.  In fact, you can download the PDF version by clicking here and you can order free print copies online at this link.  If you have further questions, you can call the NIH toll free and they can answer your questions in English or Spanish on 800-438-4380.

NIH Guide for Alzheimer's Care

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

 

Topics: Recommended Reading, Alzheimer's, Elderly Care, PDHCA, NAHC

Differentiate your Home Care Agency by Preventing Falls

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 17, 2010 7:30:00 AM

Sometimes I seek inspiration for blog postings from my twitter lists.  As a refresher, twitter is a web site where people can share little bits of information with 140 character messages.  The home Merrily Orsinicare software geek talks about twitter here.  Home Care veteran and marketing guru Merrily Orsini describes twitter as the social media's version of cocktail party conversation - it's not so deep, but it keeps you up to date on what's on people's minds.  The traditional way of using twitter is to "follow" the people whose information interests you, but some of us don't have time for that.  To help out, I've been building twitter lists for home health and private duty care.  By going to one of these lists, you can tune in on the conversation of a whole bunch of related people.  The lists are accessable at http://twitter.com/#/list/AnkotaCTO/private-duty-care and http://twitter.com/#/list/AnkotaCTO/home-care.   But I digress... one of the conversations topics I see frequently is about preventing falls and the impact of falls on seniors.  Let me share a few observations...

  • According to this post,  one out of three seniors in the US experience a fall each year, and every 18 seconds an elder is treated in an emergency room for a fall-related injury.
  • The afformentioned post also shares that the impact of the fall often results in a fear of falling, which leads sadly to more falls.
  • Finally, they share that falls is the leading cause of injury-based fatalities among those aged 65 and older
  • The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control shares that you can decrease your risk of falling via exercise, home safety improvements, medication review and vision checks.  The information is available here

One of my favorite private duty agency leaders, Hazel Kuchinsky from Ivory House told me that her agency has only had one fall in Fall Preventionthe past year among their hundreds of clients.  This makes it clear that there's something you can do about it...  So if you want to find a way to differentiate your agency, maybe this is an area that you can focus on.  I know that if I were shopping for care and I interviewed Hazel's company and she told me that one in three seniors falls every year and that falls are the leading cause of injury related deaths amoung seniors, and that her agency has had one fall in the past year, I'd take it very seriously.

What differentiates your agency?  Is it fall prevention?  Is it family communications using Ankota's FamilyConnect?  Or are you still struggling to find your focus?

FamilyConnect

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

Topics: Home Care Industry, Elderly Care, Home Care Best Practices, home care software geek

Home Care and Checklists: The Full Story from Johns Hopkins

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 15, 2010 6:24:00 AM

We've recently posted a few stories about the power of checklists.  As we know, checklists are a best practice that nurses have embraced for a long time.  We also use Home Care Telephony (using checklists for tracking care plans) as the primary mechanism for tracking the work of home health aides.  Our first post introduced the book The Checklist Manifesto, by Atul Gawande.  You can read it here.  The second post gave a powerful example of the use of checklists in management of private duty care.  You can read that post here.

But checklists aren't just for home care.  The Checklist Manifesto focuses on the power of checklists for doctors.  One of the best examples of this comes from Johns Hopkins, the home of Ankota'sDr. J Hunter Young chief medical officer, Dr. J Hunter Young, where checklists are used to improve the quality of critical care.  We briefly mentioned in our last checklist post, that Dr. Atul Gawande claims that "If a new drug were as effective at saving lives as Peter Pronovost's checklist, there would be a nationwide marketing campaign urging doctors to use it".  There's a New Yorker Article on this topic here.

We were asked to tell more about the story at Hopkins, so here goes...  The state of Michigan used a five-step checklist developed at Johns Hopkins to virtually eliminate bloodstream infections in its hospitals' intensive care units.  Not only did this work when introduced, but the state has been able to keep the number of these common, costly and potentially lethal infections near zero - even three years after first adopting the standardized procedures.

Peter Pronovost, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Dr. Peter PronovostMedicine and a patient safety expert, says that the success in Michigan has significantly changed the way physicians think about central-line catheter infections.  "Prior to our work, we thought these were largely inevitable infections and that they were simply a cost of being in the hospital," says Pronovost, the report's leader and the developer of the checklist. "Now we know they are universally preventable. We've reset the benchmark."

A more comprehensive version of this story is available on the Johns Hopkins website.  You can read it here.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Home Health Aide Software, Home Care Best Practices, thought leadership, Checklists

What I've Learned from Ankota CFO/COO Marc Ottinger

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 14, 2010 6:14:00 AM

As Ankota has grown, many of our customers, prospects and blog readers have come to know the story of our origin.  Our CEO, Will Hicklen, was inspired by the tragic loss of his wife Sandy to cancer.  This drove him to want to improve the delivery of home care.  Will brings his experience with supply chain management and Software-as-a-Service to home care.  You've also come to know the inspiration of Hunter Young, MD and Ken Accardi to our product vision, or perhaps you've enjoyed Ken's "Home Care Software Geek" posts.

Our other co-founder, COO/CFO Marc Ottinger, might not get as much visibility outside of the company, but I've learned some Marc Ottingergreat lessons from Marc, which are both worthy of admiration and worth sharing.  Marc brings his level-headed demeanor into every discussion we have.  He relies on simple principles like the reasonable man theory (modernized at the "reasonable person" in this Wikipedia Entry).  He also has prevents us from pontificating about what someone else may or may not agree to, by giving counsel like "We're entitled to ask.  They're entitled to say yes or no.  Let's ask them."

What especially impresses me about Marc is the way the people he knows are always willing to meet him, help him, counsel him and often do business with him.  When Marc asks for a meeting, nobody feels like they're threatened or exposing themselves to a sales pitch.  Marc wants to share what we've learned and to learn from others. 

So make sure that as you get to know us better, that you get to know Marc.  You'll be glad that you did.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

Topics: Home Care Best Practices, thought leadership, home care software geek, Will Hicklen

Home Health Leadership: Difficult Conversations & Improving Trust

Posted by Will Hicklen on Jun 8, 2010 1:34:00 PM

Your staff gets along well, they work together, and they have solid relationships with your clients and their families. You treat them well, pay them accordingly and respect the jobs that they do. You treat your clients in superior fashion.

Even so, conflicts happen and people have to face difficult conversations from time to time.  This is an environment that can become emotionally charged, especially when clients or their family members are distressed or jobs are at risk. Home care executives, managers and staff must prepare to handle these conversations better.

A great deal has been written on the subject of difficult conversations and I will suggest two of my favorites below. Some of the keys include understanding your own tendencies in these situations as well as those of others you encounter, and devising a plan to communicate proactively now to build greater trust for later. I encourage executive management to read these, as well as agency staff in areas such as Home Health Care, Private Duty Home care, Infusion Nursing, and any specialty where you will interact with employees, clients and their families.

Here is an example of how Ankota helps agencies institute a proactive approach to communicating: If you are familiar with Ankota's FamilyConnect, you know that it automates much of the repetitive communications between home care agencies and clients' families. If you are not familiar with it, click here for a 60 second overview -Family Connect

Aside from ensuring consistent and timely communications with family members, this regular approach to keeping them informed serves to continually "bank" trust with clients' families. This proactive approach reduces anxiety and eliminates many common misunderstandings that might later become obstacles when circumstances are more difficult.

Summary:

When stress builds, trust erodes and communications shut down. Do not wait until things become difficult, prepare yourself for these situations now with any of these resources. And, think about implementing a simple, proactive family communications strategy for your agency.

 

Topics: Recommended Reading, Home Care Industry, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, thought leadership, Will Hicklen, Home Care Scheduling Software

Home Care Leadership: Forbes.com on Planning Time Away

Posted by Will Hicklen on Jun 7, 2010 1:42:00 PM

Today's entry is somewhat different from previous posts on the Healthcare Delivery Management Blog, but it is certainly in keeping with the theme of helping our clients to operate their businesses more effectively. Whether your company delivers Medical Equipment (HME/DME), Home Infusion or Respiratory Therapy services, Private Duty Home Care, or Home Health Care, you may also struggle to find time to take time off for yourself. Knowing how to plan your own vacation, while assuring that your company continues to thrive in your absence, can be done.

According to psychologist Randy Kamen-Gredinger in a recent article on Forbes.com, "Taking an uninterrupted break from work is one of the best things anyone can do for their personal and professional life. Constant work with no down time can lead to decreased productivity, perspective and creativity. Going away gives you an opportunity to recharge and be missed on the job."

Easier said than done, right?

The article goes on to offer 11 tips for planning an extended time away from work. I found a few of them useful-maybe you will too. All 11 are in bullets below, and you can read the entire article here http://bit.ly/cLz5Yi

Feel free to comment if you have some ideas to share on the topic-

  • 1) Prepare and delegate
  • 2) Explore the area
  • 3) Hire a freelance assistant
  • 4) Get it down on paper
  • 5) Take exercise breaks
  • 6) Mix business and pleasure (hey, I didn't say I agree with everything...)
  • 7) Join the club
  • 8) Turn it off
  • 9) Barter to play
  • 10) Take a vacation during a slow period
  • 11) Swap homes

There is also a good slideshow you can flip through quickly and which gives you some good supporting comments http://bit.ly/bunu0P

Now, I'll conclude by encouraging you to plan some time off to recharge your batteries. It will make you a better and more effective leader and you just might have some fun, too.

 

Topics: Recommended Reading, Home Care Industry, Home Care Best Practices, thought leadership, Home Healthcare Delivery Management, Will Hicklen

Home Care Software Geek Shares Life Lessons from Steve Jobs

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 3, 2010 6:42:00 AM

The Home Care Software Geek posts in this blog don't talk about Home Care Nursing Software, Private Duty Telephony, DME Delivery Software, Home Infusion Care Management or the other topics we focus on regularly at Ankota.  Instead, these posts are intended to keep our readers up to date with technology trends that might be useful to your agencies, such as social media technologies, mobile devices, and what's happening from the big-boys like Microsoft, Google and Apple.

We're all familiar with Apple, and its CEO Steve Jobs.  I personally remember when the first Macintosh computers were installed in theSteve Jobs "MacLab" at college and we were all blown away.  Although Apple and its founder have had their ups and downs, they've definitely hit their stride now with the iPhone, the iPod, iTunes and the app store, the iMac, and most recently the iPad.  But this post isn't so much about the technology, but rather the philosophy of Steve Jobs.  He shares 10 life lessons in a blog article on http://www.educopark.com/.  The article there is entitled: 10 Golden Lessons from Steve Jobs.  I'd encourage you to check out their blog to get the full commentary, but for those of you who want the "Readers Digest Version," here are the 10 lessons:

  1. "Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower."
  2. "Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected."
  3. "The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. As with all matters of the heart, you'll know when you find it."
  4. "You know, we don't grow most of the food we eat. We wear clothes other people make. We speak a language that other people developed. We use a mathematics that other people evolved... I mean, we're constantly taking things. It's a wonderful, ecstatic feeling to create something that puts it back in the pool of human experience and knowledge."
  5. "There's a phrase in Buddhism, ‘Beginner's mind.' It's wonderful to have a beginner's mind."
  6. "We think basically you watch television to turn your brain off, and you work on your computer when you want to turn your brain on."
  7. "I'm the only person I know that's lost a quarter of a billion dollars in one year.... It's very character-building."
  8. "I would trade all of my technology for an afternoon with Socrates."
  9. "We're here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here?"
  10. "Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of other's opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary."

EducoPark.com

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: thought leadership, home care software geek, Home Care Technology

Checklists Improve Home Care Quality - Mini Case Study

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jun 2, 2010 8:01:00 AM

Last month on this blog, we reviewed the book "The Checklist The Checklist ManifestoManifesto" by Atul Gawande.  It's a fascinating and riveting read that people both in and out of healthcare will connect with.  Our initial post is available here.  The "angle" in our original post was that Doctors can learn from Home Health Aides and it focused on the fact that we use care plans in the form of checklists (often supported by Telephony) for Home Health Aides to report their work completion and to ensure that we're delivering the proper care to our home care patients.

Dr. Gawande talks about how nurses and paraprofessionals in health care have embraced checklists for a much longer time than doctors.  In fact, he talks specifically about how nurses institutedDr. Peter Provonost Johns Hopkins the practice of measuring temperature, pulse, blood pressure and respiration as a standard part of charting long ago and how that has improved the quality of care.  Then he talks about a checklist process put in place by Dr. Peter Provonost at Johns Hopkins in Intensive Care and claims that "If a new drug were as effective at saving lives as Peter Pronovost's checklist, there would be a nationwide marketing campaign urging doctors to use it".  There's a New Yorker Article on this topic here.  Additionally, in 2008 Time named Pronovost one of the 100 most influential people in the world; that same year, Pronovost was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, otherwise known as a "genius grant".

Today's case study focuses on checklists at the agency level and Adept Home Care Services Inccomes from our friends Karen Murphy (owner) and Kevin Jordan of Adept Home Health Care.  They shared with us that they have a 23 step process to ensure that staffing is correct for their agency (and the other agencies that they consult with).  Some of the steps in their process are unique and proprietary to the specific way that they do business, but they were kind enough to share this 12 step version of their process for our blog. 

Staffing Procedure

1.      Define which agency job titles are authorized to take referrals
2.      Enter all referrals into Log
3.      Demonstrate Nursing Authorization to admit
4.      Develop a staffing list of all service hours uncovered in the next 10 days
5.      Perform Scheduling of staff
6.      Update aide availability weekly
7.      Schedule uncovered shifts, orient staff to care plan
8.      Report staff, document orientation and reporting
9.      Check service satisfaction
10.     Add care providers to list of oriented staff as appropriate
11.     Record job offers refused by employee
12.     Setup available staff for overnights and weekends and report to on call staff

If you're using checklists to improve the quality of care in your organization and would like to share your best practice, please let us know.  Also, if you can use help to improve the quality of care delivery in your private duty care organization, perhaps Karen Murphy can help.  Contact information for Adept Health Care Services is available via the banner below.

Adept Health Care Services

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Home Care Industry, Elderly Care, Home Health Aide Software, Home Care Best Practices, thought leadership, Checklists, New York State HCP

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About Ankota

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

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