The Ankota Healthcare Delivery Management Blog

Home Care Predictions for 2012 - What do you think?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 29, 2011 9:50:00 AM

Around three years ago, Laurie Orlov pitched a large and prominent industry analyst firm with the idea that they should cover and focus on technologies for aging in place.  They said no,Laurie Orlov but she thought it was a good enough idea to go it on her own.  She created the Aging in Place Technology Watch blog and began offering consulting services in the space.  Since then, I've served in two panel events with Laurie and have enjoyed her coverage of the industry, and her inimitable snarky style.  You can visit Laurie's website to view her interesting content and sign-up for her email newsletter.

Laurie covers a lot of topics, and over the past year she's began focusing more on home care with the realization that caregivers, who are comprised of family members and outside home care workers, are a large part of the aging in place user base.  Below are Laurie's predications for home care in 2012:

HOME CARE -- gets the attention, not yet the tech deployment, it deserves.  May you live in interesting times – this past year saw the boom of jobs in home health and home companion care -- to the point where they comprise the fastest growing job so-called opportunities in the US. But given their low wages and mostly missing benefits, federal efforts are underway to apply wage and overtime protection to these 2 million or more workers -- 40% of them on Medicaid and/or food stamps. Beyond the controversy over who works, who pays and how much, there is still no talk of requiring any type of monitoring technology in the job – and in one survey from Magnolia Prime recently, at least 50% of the home care agencies surveyed reported that they had "no plans to purchase, replace, or upgrade their technology in any way." So they say

Let's dissect Laurie's prediction:

  • HOME CARE -- gets the attention... it deserves: It's great that home care is getting attention, as it should!  It's up to our industry to turn that attention towards the positive value that home care can bring (and to weed out the bad apples who bring negative attention)
  • Home Care is one of the fastest growing job "so-called" job opportunities:  Laurie points out that jobs are being created but that many home care workers are on food stamps or Medicaid.  My more optimistic view is that it's better having people working and providing a valuable service at a low wage than the alternative of being unemployed.  Also, we're seeing that health care reform will create a large number of opportunities for higher paying jobs in the arena of caregiving and that home care workers who excel and who have or develop their reading and writing skills will have a chance to move up.
  • There is still no talk of requiring any type of monitoring technology in the job: We're seeing a higher adoption rate for telephony now that companies like ours have made it affordable.  We also believe that when smart phones with data plans become universally affordable, that monitoring will improve.
  • At least 50% of the home care agencies surveyed reported that they had "no plans to purchase, replace, or upgrade their technology in any way":  We're excited about the remaining 50% who are considering upgrades.  Also we know that those who adopt technology will sustain a competitive advantage and at the most basic level will be able to add clients and caregivers without needing to increase back-office staff.

Laurie is considering an independent research study of the home care industry in 2012.  If you know companies or other organizations who might sponsor Laurie's work, please let her know.

Aging in Place Technology Watch

Let us know your predictions for home care in 2012.  You can post comments below, or if you've published home care predictions for 2012, let us know where and we'll read and share them.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Elderly Care, Home Health Aide Software, Health Care Reform, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care

New Strategies for Competition in Home Health - from Ginny Kenyon

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 22, 2011 1:03:00 PM

Ginny Kenyon has weaved another gem with her recent posting entitled "New Strategies for Competition in Home Health."  I'll keep this post short to encourage you to read the original post on Ginny's site.  This article is specifically focused on older agencies who started when there wasn't a lot of competition in their area.  Now competition is fierce...

Kenyon Home Care Consulting

The main message is that you shouldn't put all of your eggs in one basket and opportunities to diversify.  You should listen carefully to your local community for the ways that you can better meet their needs and win more referrals.  Some examples are elaborated:

  • Can you offer a "Home Modification" service?
  • Can you negotiate medication discounts for your patients (e.g., from a mail-order pharmacy)?
  • Can you offer the ability to get your patients connected with Personal Emergency Response Systems?
  • How about med dispensers?
  • How can you win referrals for chronic care management?

All agencies, and especially older and more established agencies, need to think like "start-up entrepreneurs" to expand your business model.  If you're on top of it - great!  If not, maybe Ginny can help!

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Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

 

 

 

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Home Care Industry, Elderly Care, Health Care Reform

How To Improve HME Delivery Management NOW

Posted by Will Hicklen on Dec 21, 2011 10:59:00 AM

 Improving HME Delivery Operations

In "How to Improve Delivery Operations Management," Dave Kopf, Editor of HME Business writes, "One of the major elements of HME business overhead is running delivery and repair fleets and their supporting operations. It is a staff-intensive, and involves continuing regular capital expenditure for fuel and repairs, as well as depreciating assets — the vehicles — that need to be regularly replaced."

It's on every HME's mind: How Can I Cut Costs Now?

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Kopf points out that the practice of managing deliveries and planning routes consumes a good amount of staff time, which also means more overhead. The HME industry has been grossly underserved with technology until recently, and most HMEs are still in the dark ages when it comes to leveraging technology.

Managing deliveries is both complex and expensive. Kopf and other experts note primary costs to consider, below. Ankota offers additional guidance on how technology can address and reduce these costs directly. I cannot speak for other software companies, but in our experience with Ankota's HME Optimization technology, these results can be achieved in less than one quarter, even making the system self-funding.

HME Technology Reduces Costs resized 600

It's a matter of survival. With reimbursement cuts, many HMEs are certain to fail. Technology MUST be leveraged immediately to improve profitability and allow providers to survive and grow with fewer staff. It's all about productivity improvement and that is best achieved through automation.

A few more things to consider when choosing a system:

  1. Get rid of paper now. Does the system provide a "closed loop" electronic process? You can initiate orders, plan and track staff, vehicles and deliveries (including signature capture), generate invoices and payroll -- all electronically. Your billing and payroll should be done instantly as a result, further reducing staff needed to support operations. It is not unusual for an HME to consume .5-.75 FTE filing delivery sheets, or scanning and attaching them in another system. That process can be fully automated, saving a single office several tens of thousands of dollars in direct labor costs per year. 
  2. Scheduling & Route Planning: does the system simply create routes and maps based on the schedule? Or does it utilize optimization technology to schedule deliveries in such a way that the appointments and sequence in which deliveries are made are optimized, resulting in fewer miles traveled and lower fuel expense? You want the latter, for sure. It can reduce your cost per service order by 25-50%.
  3. Integration with existing systems: Does the system connect with your order entry system so that your staff can avoid time wasting efforts like entering data multiple times? Same should go for integration with your billing and payroll systems (or services you use for these).
  4. Finally, only use web-based technology that you can pay for on a monthly or quarterly basis. The technology will serve you far longer, will provide greater innovation, and you can always hold the vendor's feet to the fire when issues come up. Good web based products will also support offline use and syrchronize when you have a connection.

 

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Delivery of Home Medical Equipment (HME/DME) is critical to the overall success of the healthcare system. HME Providers must utilize technology to maintain viabillity and survive resimbursement cuts. Technology can be used to improve profitability quickly and put HME providers in position to participate in Coordinated Care and Accountable Care models. Without Care Coordination technology that ties delivery operations to those who plan and authorize care, HMEs will be left out. 

Topics: HME Delivery Operations, HME Delivery Software, Home Healthcare Delivery Management, HME, DME, Home Care Technology, Will Hicklen, Mobile devices

"Up to One-Third of Health Spending Is Waste" - Home Care Update

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 20, 2011 11:03:00 AM

President Obama temporarily appointed Dr. Donald M. Berwick to lead the Centers forDonald Berwick - CMS Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).  When Dr. Berwick stepped down he had a few things to say:

There's an extremely high level of waste in federal health spending, ranging between 20%-30%, said Donald Berwick, the freshly departed head of the CMS. He listed five reasons for the waste: overtreatment of patients, the failure to coordinate care, the administrative complexity of the health care system, burdensome rules and fraud. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has urged CMS to improve its oversight of hospitals and other health care providers, as well as to increase enforcement of rules and cut overpayments.

Committee for Medicare and Medicaid Services

For our industry, the key questions are 1) What are some of the remedies? and 2) How can home care help?  Here are my thoughts:

  • Overtreatment of patients: Overtreatments occur because 1) the doctor is afraid of missing something so they order too many tests, 2) the tests were done already but results are not readily available so they test again, or 3) the health community is taking advantage of the pay-per-service plan that focuses on what is paid for tests and not on what tests are required.  The answer here requires payment reform that makes it more advantageous for the health system to spend less.
  • Failure to Coordinate Care: Some of the best care professionals I respect have said "we try to coordinate care because it's the right thing to do, but it's hard because we don't get paid for it".  The answer, also in the form of payment reform, will be to pay less if you don't do it. (Editor's note - this is why Ankota's main focus is to make it easier to coordinate care, and to do it with greater efficiency)
  • Administrative Complexity and Burdensome Rules: Today's health care software is mostly designed for billing, whereas it should be designed around the care delivery process (and billing should happen automatically in the background).  This is a big shift...
  • Fraud: Unfortunately there has been a history of fraudulent claims in home care and this has gotten the attention of lawmakers more than the potential benefits that home care can bring.  As an industry, home care needs to blow the whistle on fraud and make it go away.  In your own agencies, make sure to be "Squeaky clean" and invest in technologies like telephony and electronic note systems that create an unquestioned audit trail.  Then once the "bad apples" are thrown out, the focus will shift.

Many of the people in home care have been around for a while and now is the time to take the long term perspective.  Ultimately, home care can and will take center stage in fixing America's health care issues, and legislation like the "Independence at Home Act" will help.  In the mean time, provide great care, and invest to make care coordination central and to stamp-out fraud.  Good times are ahead!

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

 

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Elderly Care, Health Care Reform, Care Coordination, transitional care, Home Care, Accountable Care Organizations, ACO, ACO Technology

Home Care Software Geek Unveils the Big Tech Failures of 2011

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 19, 2011 9:19:00 AM

The Home Care Software Geek posts in this blog don't talk about Home Care Nursing Software, Private Duty Telephony, DME Delivery Software, Home Infusion Care Management or the other topics we focus on regularly at Ankota. Instead, these posts are intended to keep our readers up to date with technology trends that might be useful to your agencies, such as social media technologies, mobile devices, and what's happening from the big-boys like Microsoft, Google and Apple.

Technology companies don't always get everything right. This applies to the big giants like Google and Apple as well as little companies like Ankota. While we'd like to live life without making mistakes, such mistakes aren't always a bad thing for two reasons: 1) Mistakes often come when trying something really new and different, and 2) Often the mistake is a matter of better packaging or marketing the solution as opposed to bad technology (and often the technology can be repurposed into a winner).

Here are a few of the biggest tech mistakes of 2011:

  • Netflix/Quickster - Netflix tried to break themselves into twoQwikster Netflix Flop businesses. One for on-demand videos and one for the videos that come via the mail. Everyone was confused and nobody liked it. They eventually went back.  See a positive article about Netflix here.
  • Blackberry - These guys are struggling. They used to own the Smartphone market and now eveyone is buying iPhone and Android instead. They also tried to lauch a tablet to rival the iPad called the "Playbook" which was a flop.
  • Google Chromebook - Google had the idea that all you really need to do on your laptop is go to the web like you can do in a browser (their browser is Google Chrome) so they made a laptop that booted up into the browser and didn't do anything else. It was a flop.
  • HP Touchpad - HP released a tablet to try and rival3D TV Flop the iPad but it was bigger, heavier and the same price as the iPad so nobody bought it.
  • 3DTV - I love going to a 3D movie every once in a while. As Christmas approaches, I think of the Polar Express which I thought was awesome. But we didn't all go out and buy 3D TVs
  • Google Health - Google's attempt at a web based Patient Health Record didn't pan out and they announced that they're shutting it down.
  • Flip Video - I love this thing and my family owns a couple of them. They're little simple video cameras with a USB stick built in that let's you upload immediately to YouTube or your computer. But bottom line is that people now have this function on their smart phones.

You can read more about these and other failures in PC World magazine online here.

PC World

Here at Ankota, we use an "Agile Development Methodology" where we build things quickly and try them out. We innovate best with customers who are pushing us and guiding the requirements and design. A lot work out great the first time (with minor adjustments), and other times we miss the mark, learn from our mistakes and do it over. But customers, even the ones who didn't like the first version of something, have told us that we're the fastest innovators and most customer-focused software company they've ever dealt with... So failures aren't always bad...

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: home care software geek

Ankota's 3rd Annual Happy Holidays Video

Posted by Will Hicklen on Dec 16, 2011 9:10:00 AM

As a small company, we don't have a marketing department to tell us how inappropriate it would be to have a Happy Holiday video depicting the Ankota leadership team as a group of Santa's elves causing a ruckus.  Here's our 3rd annual wacky Santa's Elf video...  Enjoy!

In all seriousness, we want to wish you, your loved ones, and the fantastic people you provide care for a wonderful holiday and a blessed 2012.  We appreciate every one of our customers - Thank you!  We want to thank our collaborators! We also want to thank the great leaders and mentors we've come to know in the home care community, many of whom we've met face to face and others only over the phone.  We also want to thank the people who read our blog and comment and follow-us on social media and retweet us.  If we haven't met you face to face, we hope to soon!

2011 was a fantastic year for us which started with a small number of customers and is ending with fantastic growth.  We're blessed to be a part of this great community!

Enough with the serious part - in case you missed our first two wacky holiday videos, here are links:

Thank you again from all of us at Ankota!

Ankota

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

 

Topics: Holiday Wishes

Avoiding Readmissions: Incentive for ACOs, Home Health and Hospitals

Posted by Will Hicklen on Dec 16, 2011 9:09:00 AM

NEJM Rehospitalization Rates

With 20% of patients being readmitted to hospitals within 30 days of discharge--and 34% being readmitted within 90 days--readmission rates have become a leading measure of the quality of a hospital's care (data: New England Journal of Medicine, 2009). The Affordable Care Act attacks this issue head on with financial penalties amounting to reductions in payments of 1-3%. Constant offenders will see penalties rise further. Considering the fact that most hospitals run on margins that range from negative to 3%, it is likely that this penalty will render most hospitals insolvent.

This is a mandate to send patients home for successful recoveries and save the Medicare system tens of billions of dollars in the process. Private insurers will follow the same model, forcing additional savings to the system in the range of tens of billions of dollars as well. 

There is no doubt whatsoever that the hospitals are in crisis-mode. They basically have a year to get their act together and get this readmissions problem under control or face severe financial penalties. 

What is the cost is this frequent rehospitalization? According to the New England Journal of Medicine it costs CMS--the taxpayers-- $17.4 BILLION in 2009 alone. Tremendous opportunities exist for those who can help hospitals reduce the rate at which people have to be readmitted.

One of the greatest opportunities to mitigate readmissions lies with home health care and related companies. The companies that provide the nurses, aides, therapists, equipment, medications and supplies for care that is delivered outside of the hospital -- what Ankota calls the "Home Care Ecosystem" -- are uniquely suited to be the primary delivery model for the care that keeps patients at home, where they recover faster, better and they are happier. 

This economic alignment is giving rise to Accountable Care models, which is already forcing hospitals to cooperate with providers in the Home Care Ecosystem. Sigificant pressure is on them to operate efficiently, cooperate with other providers, and be accountable for patient outcomes.

Ankota's web-based technology enables Care Coordination among hospitals, Accountable Care Organizations, and the home care ecosystem, and instantly helps them operate their businesses more efficiently. Contact Ankota to learn more or request a demo

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Click on the MAP below to see how your state compares 

NEJM reshospitalization rates

Topics: Health Care Reform, Care Coordination, transitional care, Will Hicklen

Home Care Can Stymie the Readmission Revolving Door

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 14, 2011 11:07:00 AM

Our friend Bernie Smith sent me a great article from yesterday's Washington post aboutRevolving Door is Bad Medicine - Washington Post Readmissions.  It's by Ranit Mishori and is entitled "Revolving Door is Bad Medicine".  As you know, we always try to send you the link to the full article, but this time I can't find it - so sorry about that!    Some highlights of the article are as follows:

  • Reducing readmissions can save the country $17 Billion dollars a year
  • Medicare readmissions rates are 20% in the first 30 days and 34% within 90 days based on a 2009 study in the New England Journal of Medicine
  • There's a new incentive (in the form of a penalty) for hospitals to reduce readmissions.  Hospitals on the naughty list will lose 1 percent of their Medicare reimbursement in 2012 and this grows to 3%

Never has home care been more important in the health system.  This is a call-to-action for your agency to find ways to help hospitals stay on the nice list.

Two other cool things about the article:

  • It talks about a computerized virtual discharge nurse (named Louise) who helps prepare patients to leave the hospital.  I've been hearing about Louise in several conferences in the past months.  The most remarkable thing being that she's getting very high patient satisfaction marks, and in particular patients like that she's willing to spend as much time with them as they need
  • It also gives a checklist called "What Patients Can Do" which we include below (and you know that we love checklists - see Ankota's 2010 Book of the Year "The Checklist Manifesto")

How Patients can Avoid ReadmissionsAs your agency considers your key strategic initiatives for 2012, put readmission avoidance at the top of your list!

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Elderly Care, Home Care Best Practices, Health Care Reform, Care Coordination, transitional care

The Best Home Care Leaders are good at Seeing the Big Picture

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 12, 2011 10:43:00 AM

The home care industry is blessed with some great veteran consultants who share their expertise with the industry.  We're pleased to have met many of them at conferencesStephen Tweed from Leading Home Care, to learn from them and to share their insights on our blog.  Today's article is from Stephen Tweed who leads Leading Home Care.  We've featured Stephen on the Ankota blog numerous times in the past, including this piece sharing Stephen's tips for selling home health to physicians, and this more recent and somewhat controversial piece where Stephen shares the insight that social media doesn't seem to work for home health - in the piece his points are contrasted with a piece by Merrily Orsini about how to make social media work in home care.

Seeing The Bigger Picture

by Stephen Tweed

In January of 1997, I was sitting in the office of Chip Liversidge, the CEO of Community Health Services in Portland, Maine.  We had just finished a board of directors planning retreat and we were reminiscing about Chip's 30 years as a CEO in home health care.  Chip made a very interesting comment. 

He said, "One of my big regrets is that we, as an industry, have not invested enough in developing the next generation of home care leaders."  This one statement led us to more conversation and an industry survey of home health care CEOs.  That one conversation ultimately led to starting this company, Leading Home Care.

Chip and I surveyed over 200 home health care CEOs to identify the top characteristics of highly effective home care leaders.  The results were a vast set of ideas, information, data, and opinions about what makes great leaders in home health care in Amercia.

Clearly, the number one factor identified by those CEOs they called, "Seeing the Bigger Picture."  As we have continued to study that concept over the past 14 years, we are much clearer about what that means.

Home Health Care Leaders who "See the Bigger Picture" are leaders who have:Sign up for newsletters from Leading Home Care

  • A clear model of strategic thinking.
  • The ability to objectively assess the current reality of their home care business.
  • An understanding of the forces and trends shaping the future of our industry.
  • A clear picture of the business of home care.
  • A clearly defined source of competitive advantage in the marketplace.
  • A keen awareness of the factors that drive the economic engine of home health care.
  • Tools and Techniques for measuring results.

That research and the revelation that the key characteristic of highly effective home care leaders is "Seeing the Bigger Picture" has driven much of what we have done over the past decade at Leading Home Care.  We created the Academy for Home Care Leadership™, and a series of keynote speeches and learning seminars based on those results.  This research, combined with my first book, Strategic Focus: A Gameplan for Developing Competitive Advantage, helped me to refine our Model of Strategic Thinking.

To learn more about Stephen's Model of strategic thinking and more great content, we'd encourage you go to Stephen's website at http://leadinghomecare.com/ 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Home Care Industry, Elderly Care, Home Care Best Practices, Health Care Reform, thought leadership, Home Care, Home Care Blogs, Learning

If Home Care Gets Involved in Bundled Payments Does it Work?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 9, 2011 12:19:00 PM

Our friends at Boyd & Nicholas, "The Cost Report People" provide a weekly newsletter that is a nice overview of issues affecting home care.  This week they included a nice summary of a story in Healthcare Finance News about bundled payments.  Usually we're upbeat on the Ankota blog, but this story doesn't share the best news.  My guess is that when you have one organization responsible for managing care and managing a budget (like Keiser or the VA) they figure it out, but when you give money to one party and expect them to share it fairly that it's going to be tough...

Boyd & Nicholas

Cutting healthcare cost with bundled payments proves difficult

Originally in Healthcare Finance News, November 8, 2011, summarized by Boyd and Nicholas December 7, 2011
 
Bundling payments to providers as a means to cut healthcare costs is proving harder to do than originally anticipated, according to a new study from non-profit research organization Rand Corp.
 
The Rand study examined the first three years of one of the major efforts to test the concept of bundled payments:  The PROMETHEUS Payment project launched by the Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute.  Results of the study will be published in the November issue of Health Affairs.
 
... the project is intended to show that bundling payments to doctors, hospitals and other health providers into a single payment would encourage the different providers to work together to both treat all aspects of particular procedures and diseases while eliminating unnecessary care.
 
But the Rand study found that three years after launch, no bundled payments had been made and no payment contracts for bundled payments have been executed.  Although all parties involved with the effort are committed to its success, researchers say the slow progress underscores the challenges such complex payment reforms must overcome. ...
 
The adoption of bundled payments was slowed by a number of different issues including which health problems should be included in a payment bundle, as well as difficulty convincing providers that the cost cutting measures that would be required wouldn't compromise quality of care.

Healthcare Finance News

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Elderly Care, Health Care Reform, Care Coordination, transitional care, Accountable Care Organizations, ACO, ACO Technology

Nursing and Home Care are the key to the Future of Healthcare

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 6, 2011 12:33:00 PM

When people ask me what health care reform should be, I explain that the key is to focus on the most expensive patients (many of whom are elderly people with multiple chronic diseases) and to have care management nurses who coordinate and navigate their care.  I believe that this will reduce the cost of health care by many billions of dollars per year while creating jobs.  It's a true win for all parties, especially the patients.  Today's post was inspired by an article in Healthcare Finance News that shares the same view.

Healthcare Finance News

Their article is entitled "Nurses have more opportunities under healthcare reform" by Stephanie Bouchard.  Here are a few of the interesting points:

  • Nurse navigators and care coordinators are becoming an integralHome Care Nursing part of the coordinated care models healthcare reform supporters are saying will improve quality of care and keep healthcare costs down
  • "[Nurses] have knowledge of disease processes and treatment, but they also understand and are really schooled in theoretical foundations of human behavior. Why people would comply or not comply based on their health beliefs" per Catherine Garner, PhD, RN, dean of health sciences and nursing at American Sentinel University
  • As healthcare facilities transform themselves into coordinated care models, nursing directors are increasingly finding themselves in expanding leadership roles

Go nurses!!!  If your organization is attempteing to pioneer new models of care coordination and you need help automating the delivery process, let us know if we can help - that's what Ankota is all about!

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Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota 

 

Topics: Elderly Care, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination

Choosing the Best Elder Care for Your Loved One

Posted by Marc Ottinger on Dec 5, 2011 10:11:00 AM

We get a lot of questions about Elder Care options, and we have friends with the answers...  Today's post features content from the website Assisted Living Today.  They have developed guides that describe five major options for elderly care, which we present to you below:

While most of our work at Ankota focuses on independent living, we offer our FamilyConnect product for Assisted Living and Nursing Homes, and we're on the verge of starting a new project to support an organization delivering dental hygiene services in nursing homes.  Moreover, we think it's important for families to know all of the options and choose what works best for their situation.

Click me  

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital.  Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care.  To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota 

 

Topics: Elderly Care, Home Care

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About Ankota

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

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