The Ankota Healthcare Delivery Management Blog

21 Points That Make for Good Clinicians in Post Acute Care

Posted by Will Hicklen on Mar 30, 2012 1:18:00 PM

I ran across this post on LinkedIn and thought I'd share it right away, from Angela Gentile, of Gerontology Professionals of Canada. Angelina begins with a few thoughts about bedside manner, and follows with 21 points that make a good clinician.

"Coventional" wisdom suggests that we shouldn't post articles on a Friday afternoon beacuse it won't attract as many readers. So, I'd like to ask for you help in proving the naysayers wrong (I love doing that) and SHARE this article with your staff and colleagues at other agencies. I think it's a terrific piece that challenges executive leadership and clinicians alike to think about what makes them, and their staff, good caregivers. This should be useful for you whether your business is in managing care transitions or post acute care services such as Private Duty Home Care, Home Health, Physical Therapy, Infusion Nursing or even HME/DME.

 

Gerontology Professionals of CanadaAngelina Gentile pic 

About bedside manner, Angelina Gentile says, "There are certain qualities that are needed in order to be good at what we do.  This is also known as “good bedside manner”:  

  • Demonstrate and practice good communication and listening skills

  • Recognize and value the importance of patience

  • Act with compassion and empathy

  • Treat clients with respect and dignity at all times

  • Demonstrate the ability to establish and maintain professional boundaries and manage violations should they occur

  • Possess a non-blaming, non-judgmental approach towards our client’s lifestyle and problems

  • Appreciate and respect the cultural differences

  • Be aware of and demonstrate sensitivity to any religious or spiritual beliefs

The general rule of thumb is, “treat others as you would wish to be treated”.  Most of us have been, or will be, on the receiving side of a clinician’s assistance. 

Click here to read the entire piece, including 21 Essential Tips for the Good Clinician

Topics: Geriatric Care Management, Long Term Care, Home Care Industry, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, thought leadership, transitional care, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care Technology, Home Care Mobile Solutions, Will Hicklen, PDHCA, Home Therapy, National Association of Geriatric Care Managers, Home Care Blogs

Home Care Recruitment / Retention Best Practices from Easy Living

Posted by Ken Accardi on Mar 29, 2012 7:43:00 AM

Unlike traditional publishing, blogging is more of a conversational means of communication and we've had the privilege of reading and learning from other people's blogs.  In our efforts to encourage the home care social media conversation, we share blog content from others and today we have the guest blogger Alex Chamberlain.  Alex is Executive Director at EasyLiving, Inc., a fully licensed, private duty home health care company serving individuals and families in Pinellas and Pasco counties in Florida.  EasyLiving was named a 2011 “Top Small Business in the South” by Business Leader Magazine and the 4th fastest growing company in Tampa Bay Business Journal’s “Fast 50” of 2010.

Creative Solutions to Top Home Care Challenges: Recruitment & Retention

by Alex Chamberlain

If you work in the home care industry, you know that human resources are not only your most challenging but also your most valuable resources.  Simply in order to keepalex chamberlain easy living pace, home care companies need a steady stream of workers.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of home health aides is projected to grow by 50 percent between 2008 and 2018, much faster than general employment.

Home care companies provide care that is very personal, is most often carried out away from a “controlled environment” and brings a lot of challenges for our workforce.  In order to succeed, we not only need enough workers but they need to be sufficiently able to handle the work in a quality manner.

How does a home care company develop a quality staff?  Each variable within your human resources process impacts the overall quality of your staff.  At its simplest, you need:

1.  A big enough pipeline of potential employees

2.  A selective process to determine which of those prospects is a fit

3.  Sufficient training and support to enable their success

4.  Rewards, feedback, and ongoing training and engagement to retain employees and help them improve and grow

Like most successful home care companies, EasyLiving Home Health focuses our efforts on human resources.  But, we believe it is incumbent on us to foster positive behavior and growth, rather than focus primarily on discipline.  Our philosophy is that when you reward good behavior, you get more of it…if you just punish negative behavior you simple get less negative behavior—not the way to thrive.

Last year, we launched an employee program called iCaRewards™.  Here’s a brief overview of the program components:

  • Primarily a rewards program, where caregivers earn points for doing things like referring a friend, answering a trivia question in a newsletter or on Facebook, or getting a “great job” sticker from a client
  • Points can be redeemed for prizes (such as refurbished computers from the office, grocery store or gas gift certificates)
  • Comprehensive communications to employees

This program aims to address several of the human resource variables/challenges.  One of its primary goals is employee engagement.  In the home care industry, we all understand the challenges of a mobile workforce, who often work multiple places at the same time or move frequently from employer to employer, based on small pay differences/ incentives or who can provide the most hours. 

Our iCaRewards™ program includes regular communications to employees (including rewards to those who engage with us further through social media), including fun and personal communications to engage staff and make them feel part of the team.  Additionally, the program includes periodic events, to bring employees in to the office, help them get to know (and feel comfortable with) office/management staff and to provide something fun and different in terms of rewards.  We have had breakfast events, pizza lunches and holiday get-togethers.  In a couple instances, caregivers have brought their client along to the events.  Management staff, caregiver and client were able to interact in a fun way.  This has made the caregiver and client both more engaged.

Easy Living banner

The program also addresses the first human resources dilemma, getting a sufficient pipeline of prospective employees.  One of the primary rewards mechanisms in iCaRewards™ is gaining points for “referring a friend” (and proportional rewards based on them taking various steps and actually becoming/staying employed). 

We also feature caregivers on our website and in various communications-you may be interested in seeing one of the ways we do this on our Florida Home Caregiver Profiles.

How are you getting creative with your human resources challenges?

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Elderly Care, Home Care Best Practices, Home Care, Home Care Blogs

Home Care Software Geek Shares 5 Key Technologies for the Elderly

Posted by Ken Accardi on Mar 27, 2012 12:33:00 PM

Laurie Orlov is an expert consultant focused on technologies for Aging in Place.  She shares a wealth of information about technologies that are emerging for elderly careLaurie Orlov and specifically those that can enable elderly people to age in their homes.  Laurie has what I consider a "snarky" style and a lot of her articles are along the lines of "Here's an idea that didn't work - well duh!."  The article that I'm sharing today has more of a positive spin.  It's entitled "Five consumer technologies that should be in every senior housing unit."  Although the title suggests that that these are for senior housing, they seem to me to be applcable for elderly people in general.

So what technologies are ready for prime time with seniors?  Here's the list:

  • High Speed Internet Access: Perferably available everywhere and not just in common areas
  • Support for Video and Skype: Communications with associated video enable you to see how mom looks when you talk with her and enable her to see her grandkids from afar.
  • Mobile PERS and GPS Locator: Many traditional Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERS) have a maximum range of 600 feet.  Now there are mobile solutions available and they are coming to smart phones.
  • Medication Dispensing: Could preloaded med dispensers reduce errors, increase med adherence and free up time for nurses to provide more care?
  • Kindle Reader or App in Shared Kiosk: The kiosk doesn't make sense for home care, but the book reader is a great idea

It's great to see that some technologies are ready to help seniors.  Can your home care organization enable your clients to get access to these technologies?

Technology Options for Older Adults

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Elderly Care, Aging in Place Technology, home care software geek, Home Care Technology

Boomer to Boomer is in the Home Care Social Media Conversation

Posted by Jed Hammel on Mar 26, 2012 11:14:00 AM

Your friendly neighborhood social media marketing expert here!  I’m back again to share some interesting and topical articles that I found buzzing around the web.  And once again I am impressed by the wide array of conversations taking place online abou the Private Home Care industry.

Jed Hammel and Amy Accardi

My ultimate goal is to present a few conversations that can help folks following Ankota build their business, offer a different perspective, and perhaps inspire them.  Here are a few conversations happening online that you may want to join or to learn more about:

 

8 Ways To Help Care For Your Elderly Parents

This article comes from Boomer To Boomer Online, "a toolbox for confronting ‘old age’." (Twitter Handle: BoomertoBoomerOnline).  It is a clear, consice, and useful list for those with Elderly parents.  For those of us in the industry, it is a helpful way for us to see the process through the eyes of our customers.  What do you think of hthe list?  Any thoughts you'd like to share?

Study: Hospitals Can Speed Mental Decline for Elderly

SeniorHomes.com, a free resource for people looking for senior care or housing, (Twitter Handle: @Seniorhomes) shares this article from the Chicago Sun Times.  It sheds some light on the effects of hospitalization for elderly folks.  Though some of the findings may present information that you already know, it can be interesting to review the findings of a study.  Did the data surprise you, one way or another?

Article: In-Home Care Helps Beat The Clock on Heart Disease

Buttressing the findings of the above mentioned study is this article posted by The Tennessean and suggested by Home Care Advisor (Twitter Handle: @dearkaty), a "Home care advisor for caregivers who assist elder seniors and anyone with physical disabilities, Alzheimer’s and dementia. With Professional Healthcare at Home."

The article's author, Kevin S. Henning, M.D, breaks down the overall picture of the research data that I think will be found to be helpful by those learned in the subject as well as the lay person.

What are some of your favorite blogs that you think are a “must-read”?  Are there any industry insiders or online sources that you’d like to Champion?  What conversations are you currently a part of?  Please let me know so I can share your suggestions in future posts.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: fighting heart disease

Should Home Care Be the New Hospital?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Mar 21, 2012 10:29:00 AM

I came across a very interesting article entitled "Why one-third of hospitals will close by 2020."  The article, by David Houle and Jonathan Fleece appears on the website KevinMD.com.  Some of the key points raised about why one-third of the hospitals will close are as follows:

  • Health-Care is too Expensive, and hospitals are among the most expensive part
  • Hospitals are dangerous: 100,000 preventable deaths each year (the equivalent of 200 747 airplane crashes)
  • Customer Service in Hospitals is Abysmal - averaging 4 hour waits in emergency rooms
  • Transparency is Coming - people will be able to see which hospitals are better than others and the losers will go out of business

KevinMD.com

Whether the above prediction is right or wrong, for me it begs the question of Where will the Hospital Be?  My answer is that home care will be the new hospitcal.  Here's why:

  • Home Care is less expensive
  • Home Care is safer for two reasons: care at home avoids the dangerous travel to and from the hospital, and staying home avoids exposure to infection
  • Home Care customer service is personal and attentive

There's a great future for home care, and we're glad to be part of it!

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Home Care Industry, Elderly Care, Health Care Reform, transitional care, Home Healthcare Delivery Management, Home Care, Accountable Care Organizations, ACO

The Boomer Summit is in the Home Care Social Media Conversation

Posted by Jed Hammel on Mar 19, 2012 9:12:00 AM

This week I have curated another set of vibrant online discussions in the home care field.  This comes as no surprise as we all know that we are in a thriving industry made up of smart, dedicated, and passionate individuals eager to share their ideas and to grow their business. Jeremy Hammel with Amy Accardi

The challenge is that it sometimes can be difficult to find time to sift through and digest all the information available.  As a way to distill some of the content for you, here are a few conversations happening online that you may want to join or to learn more about:  

The 9 Essential Elements of Quality Care

Carol Marak, (Twitter handle: @Carebuzz) is a family caregiver & advocate for work/life balance when caring for elderly loved ones.  She recently shared this article from PHI. 

The concise and thoughtful piece outlines: "...essential elements of high-quality care, services, and support for people who receive long-term care–whether in their own homes or in a nursing home, assisted living community, or other long-term care settings."

It is also yet another reminder that we are in the People Business.  What do you think of the list?  Is there anything you add or subtract?  Do you have any examples that you'd like to share that illustrates one of the nine Elements listed?

Home Care Executives:  Are you going to the What's Next Boomer Business Summit?

Here's another useful resource brought to my attention by the prolific Laurie Orlov (Twitter Handle: @Aging Tech), an industry analyst and tech for aging in place:

"What's Next Boomer Business Summit is an annual event that brings together the country's top businesses and organizations that are focused on the baby boomer and beyond marketplace. It is where deals get done."

One of the key topics will be: "New Service Economy: Housing, Caregiving, Mobility and Healthcare." 

Will you be attending this year?  Those of you who attended last year, did you have an exciting take-aways or eurakas?

Recommended Blog: Caregiving.com BetteandMargaret1

Denise M. Brown (Twitter handle: @caregiving) writes a unique and engaging blog and has a lot to offer the conversation.  As she put's it: "I help family caregivers. Founder, Caregiving.com | Certified Caregiving Coach | Author | Speaker. Interests include social media, biking, sports and travel."

Denise adds a personal touch to the issues and topics facing both our industry as a whole and those who we care for in it. 

What are some of your favorite blogs that you think are a “must-read”?  Are there any industry insiders or online sources that you’d like to Champion?  What conversations are you currently a part of?  Please let me know so I can share your suggestions in future posts.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Home Care Blog, Elderly Care, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care Blogs

"In the Words" of Home Health Care Leaders

Posted by Ken Accardi on Mar 14, 2012 7:47:00 AM

A former business associate of Leading Home Care's Stephen Tweed went on to build a business that writes books based on the words of various groups of leaders.  His most recent book is "In THE WORDS OF 100 HHC Directors," which is available as a downloadable e-book.  Below, courtesy of Stephen Tweed, we share some of the top findings from the book.  The original article is by Stephen Tweed in Home Health Care Today #231 dated March 7th, 2012.

In The WORDS of 100™... A unique glimpse into the real world of 100 Home Health Care Agency Executive Directors 
by Stephen Tweed

In 1990, I merged my company, Tweed Corporation, with my friend and colleague, Al Weber,Stephen Tweed to start a consulting company called Tweed-Weber, Inc. Our focus was strategic planning, training, and consulting in the home health care industry. In 1992, I married Elizabeth Jeffries, moved to Louisville, KY and set up another office of Tweed-Weber. In 1996, we sold Tweed-Weber, Inc. to Al and our employees, and Elizabeth and I started Tweed Jeffries, LLC. All very confusing. 

Except, now there are two companies with my name on the door, both serving the home health care industry. Tweed-Weber has evolved into a research and planning company, and they have broadened their services beyond home health care. However, they still do some research and strategic planning for some home health agencies. 

Their newest venture is a series of books called, “In the WORDS of 100,” based on interviews and sureys of 100 practitioners in various industries. The newest book is based on surveys of executive directors of home health agencies. In the WORDS of 100™…A unique glimpse into the real world of 100 Home Health Care Agency Executive Directors is now available online. This 92 page WORDS of 100™ e-book is packed with Insights, Ideas and Inspirationthat will connect current and aspiring Home Health Care Agency Executive Directors from across the country in a very unique way. 

Some Key Findings from the Research 

The interviews gave us some very interesting information about the hearts and minds of successful home health agency leaders. Here are some highlights from the study. 

Important Qualities to be a Home Health Agency Director 
1. Good Leadership Skills 
2. Good Management / Organizational Skills 
3. Be a Strategic Thinker 
4. Be knowledgeable of the industry 
5. Be knowledgeable of regulations 
6. Be empathetic, compassionate, patient 
7. Be adaptable / flexible 
8. Be a good communicator 
9. Show honesty, integrity, and fairness 
10. Be a good listener 

No surprises there. Here are some other insights from the study. 

The Main Challenges of a Home Health Agency Executive 
1. Reimbursement and Financial Issues 
2. Recruitment and Retention of quality personnel 
3. Regulatory and Medicare changes 
4. Personnel and staffing issues 
5. Competition and growth 
6. Providing enough staff education 
7. Providing quality care to patients 

The book is laced with quotes from the participants like: 

"Recruiting competent staff is the biggest challenge. In home health care, you can find nurses, but finding the level of competency that is required is tougher. Nurses are waiting in line to come to work, but many of them don’t have the skills we need." 

The book also contains some interesting insights on how to address these challenges. I’m sure you’ll find these ideas very useful. 

What did some of the 100 participants say? 

Here’s what some of the 100 CEOs who were interviewed said about their interview experience: 

“I can’t wait to see what others in my position had to say. It can feel veryWORDSof100 logo lonely in this job when you feel like no one understands the pressures we face on a daily basis. I hope what I’ve shared helps someone along the way, and I hope I will learn from the experience of others. Thanks for wanting to talk to me.” 

“I hope your results on this will tell me what I can improve. I usually never do these things, but I’m very glad I took the time to talk to you. Thank you for choosing me. I can’t wait for the results!” 

“This was a great interview! I really enjoyed talking to you about what I do. It’s fun to talk about the personal side rather than just the technical side. People don’t usually ask me about that.” 

“It is so important to feel connected to others in my same position, but sometimes I just don’t have the time. This book will be a really convenient resource when we want to see what everyone else thinks.” 

“Wow. What a great interview! I feel a million times lighter than I did this morning. Great questions! I’ll be excited to see if others share my opinion.” 

“This survey is truly about what this role is. I thought it was going to be more generalized questions, but it truly is about this position. Thank you.” 

“This will be a wonderful catalyst for discussion at many of our home care meetings. Thank you for wanting to connect all of us.” 

To learn more about this book, go to www.wordsof100.com. The book is available for immediate download for only $24.95.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Elderly Care, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Home Healthcare Delivery Management, Home Care

Aging in Place Tech is in the Home Care Social Media conversation

Posted by Jed Hammel on Mar 12, 2012 1:15:00 PM

Looking around the web for current discussions in the home care field, I found a wide variety of interesting and active conversations.  Whether the topic is Best Practices, industry news, business advice/support, or personal diaries, there is a mountain of valuable information out there for us.  Jeremy Jed HammelThe good news is that we are in a thriving industry made up of smart, dedicated, and passionate individuals eager to share their ideas and to grow their business. 

The challenge is that it sometimes can be difficult to find time to sift through and digest all the information available.  As a way to distill some of the content for you, here are a few conversations happening online that you may want to join or to learn more about:  

Five Consumer Technologies That Should Be In Every Senior Housing Unit

Laurie Orlov (Twitter Handle: @Aging Tech), an industry analyst and tech for aging in place, recently offered this useful article about the role of technology in the lives of senior housing residents.  Click here to read Laurie's article.

What do you think of her list?  Are there any additions that you’d like to see in the mix?  Or, do you feel that the less technology, the better?

Home Care Executives: Why Social Media is the Right Choice

Are you using Facebook to market your business?  Marketing maven, Kevin Cary from Walker Marketing astutely points out in his blog post that: 

A recent report by National Healthcare revealed that 96 percent of respondents said they used Facebook to get healthcare information. The report also stated that 4 out of 10 respondents said social media was “very likely” or “likely” to impact future health-care decisions and 39% said they have a “very high” or “high” level of trust in social media. Only 6.2% claimed to have a “very low level” of trust in the growing social media world."

Whether you are already onboard with social media or if you are skeptical about it, this article provides us with useful food for thought.

Recommended Blog: ArthurAndBernie.comPoppoptwitter

Laura Hahn’s blog, Arthurandbernie.com (Twitter handle: @arthurandbernie) was suggested to us by Minnesota Home Care (Twitter handle: @mnhomecare) who also have a great blog that I suggest you taking a look at. 

Arthurandbernie.com is a personalized account of the value of people connecting with each other across generations.  By touching on a number of the issues surrounding elder folks, Laura's blog is a nice reminder that we are the business of Caring.

There are a lot of great conversations happening on the web and I will continue to highlight a few of them regularly. 

What are some of your favorite blogs that you think are a “must-read”?  Are there any industry insiders or online sources that you’d like to Champion?  What conversations are you currently a part of?  Please let me know so I can share your suggestions in future posts.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Blogging, Home Care Industry, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care Blogs

Home Care Software Geek: Smart Phones outnumber Traditional Cells

Posted by Ken Accardi on Mar 6, 2012 10:31:00 AM

The Home Care Software Geek posts in this blog don't talk about Home Care Nursing Software, Private Duty Telephony, DME Delivery Software, Home Infusion Care Management or the other topics we focus on regularly at Ankota. Instead, these posts are intended to keep our readers up to date with technology trends that might be useful to your agencies, such as social media technologies, mobile devices, and what's happening from the big-boys like Microsoft, Google and Apple.

According to an article in Tech Crunch, Smart Phones now outnumber traditional Feature Phones in the US.   Since a picture can paint a thousand words, let's look at the stats...

SmartPhoneOwnership2011 2012

As you see, more people have smartphones now than traditional feature phones.  What does that mean for home care?  A LOT:Tipping Point

  • Smart Phones enable multiple forms of commuications like text and email.
  • Smart phones allow you to run applications (APPs) that can include clinical documentation, check-in and check-out and even diagnostic apps
  • We believe that telephony can be replaced by a smart phone app for home health aides and non-medical caregivers

What's your plan for Smart Phones?  You can read the full article from Tech Crunch here.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Home Care Industry, home care software geek, Home Care Technology

Social Networking and Private Duty: How To Join The Conversation

Posted by Jed Hammel on Mar 4, 2012 10:59:00 PM

My past two posts discussed the merits of using social networking to market your private duty home care business.  Ultimately, my opinion is that social networking is a form of traditional “face-to-face” networking that happens to be facilitated by online platforms.  Jeremy HammelI believe that social networking is a key part to any business’ sales/marketing strategy.  Social networking is a more nuanced form of communication than traditional marketing, and as such, it needs to be implemented in an accordingly nuanced fashion.

Now that we understand this, how do we put our knowledge to work?

I think that the first step is to reframe our perception of what social networking is as an overall concept.  One idea that I like was offered by Mike Troiano (@miketrap) from Holland-Mark.  He compared it to a cocktail party:  "You can't just walk up to them and sell your services, it takes time and tact to make a good connection." (Mass Technology Leadership Council Blog)

When attending a cocktail party, your number one goal may very well be to promote yourself or your business.   But a cocktail party is a casual and social setting.  It is not the venue for you to try the “Hard Sell” on people.  Business may be discussed and deals may even get done, but the overarching purpose of a cocktail party is for people to be social with each other.megaphone

When you first arrive at a cocktail party, you can't stand in the middle of the room with a megaphone and shout out your sales pitch and expect anyone to listen.  I wouldn’t recommend doing that an actual party either, but I think you get my point.  In order to have anyone listen to what you have to offer, you must first allow others to speak.  You keep the conversations light, topical, and you tailor your conversation pieces to fit the specific people you're talking to.  You endeavor to figure out what their needs are, and after you build up a shared trust, you offer your services to them. 

The Bottom Line:  Though social networking is a marketplace to promote and sell your product, it has different expectations and a new set of “rules” than traditional marketplaces.  If you want people to be receptive to your message in the social networking marketplace, you must adhere to these new rules.  

You must engage your customer by taking the time to listen and understand what their needs are.  When you do that, sales will come easily because you have earned your audience's attention.

So, is your business engaged in the conversation of your industry or are you "mega-phoning" your message?  Have you committed to being present at the party?  Or are you only stopping by just long enough to say what you want?  Do you give the same care and attention to nurturing your online friends, fans, and followers as you do your patients, residents, and clients.

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Blogging, Home Care Best Practices, Home Care Blogs

Home Care Leadership Redefined

Posted by Ken Accardi on Mar 1, 2012 7:47:00 AM

We enjoy Ginny Kenyon's home care consulting blog so much that we share her stories frequently.  In this week's post which she entitled "Leading Healthcare Into the Future – Any Takers?," Ginny lays out ways in which good leadership has evolved, and gives us someInterimLeadership guidance on closing the gaps in our leadership skills.  She gives us the following self-assessment quiz:

  • How effective are we at embracing the "new world" of home health and home care? 
  • Do we know what the “new world” in healthcare might look like? 
  • How good are we at implementing new things and achieving a target, and sustaining it for months and years? 
  • How good are we at hiring well and systematically hiring for fit? 
  • How good are we at engaging people and having them enthusiastically follow you to achieve a goal? 
  • Are you an authentic and transparent leader? 
  • Are you a truth teller or do you tend to skirt away from an answer or bend the facts just a little toward your benefit? 
  • Are you able to speak up in opposition, respectfully? 
  • Do you have to be right? 
  • Do you take credit for wins or do you shine the light on others? 
  • Do you take feedback well that helps you improve?

I'm sure that everyone has areas to improve upon.  Why not read the rest of the advice in Ginny's post.

Kenyon Home Care Consulting

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital. Today Ankota services home health, private duty care, DME Delivery, RT, Physical Therapy and Home Infusion organizations, and is interested in helping to efficiently manage other forms of care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota

Topics: Home Care Industry, Elderly Care, Leadership, Home Care Blogs

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Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

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