The Ankota Healthcare Delivery Management Blog

Home Care Software Vet Proposes Health Care System Solutions

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jul 28, 2016 7:09:59 PM

My friend Scott Herrmann has been a home care industry veteran with broad industry experience in home care not only in the US but also in Canada and Australia.  He recently helped Ankota with our early development of Foresight Care.  He's now working for Medocity who provide a patient engagement and telehealth solution.  Scott is our guest author today and shares suggestions for fixing the healthcare industry from his own experience.

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAWZAAAAJGMwM2FlZTk0LWNiYWYtNGVkZS04ZWMwLWUwYTA3NWYwZmFiNA.jpgThe continuing story of our fractured health care system seems to be highlighted in the news most every day. Failures in patient care coordination, from medication errors to lack of communication between providers, all add to increased costs, additional suffering for patients and, most importantly. their pocketbooks!

More often than not, these reasons become a barrier to providing quality care and better outcomes. In this day and age of MACRA (Medicare Access & CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015) and Value Based Purchasing,  providers are driven to new performance standards or get paid less for the services they provide. MACRA and VBP both drive the providers to achieve more, perform better and get quality outcomes as fast as possible in this fairly new patient centered care coordination approach. Basically you must make improvements each and every calendar quarter. You know, do more and do it right, and know you’re penalized if you fail to do it. Trust me, that’s not easy.

Personally speaking as my own “medical supervisor,” I have learned ways to reduce my own out of pocket costs and try to begin to break down silos of information, bringing my health data together so I can keep track of current conditions and ways to stay healthy. Blood tests at an outsourced facility are actually much less expensive than having blood drawn at a clinic or my provider’s office. I still cannot believe I did the tests at the latter two, before finding out that if I eliminate the insurer from the equation my personal out of pocket costs are less than if the insurer “helps” with my care.

It seems stupid but it’s true. As long as I get the results, and the quality of the service is good, why would I want to pay more? If I stay healthy, I am never going to meet my annual deductible, so let’s use the private paid services for what I need to get done. I am not saying I don’t visit my doctor each year for an annual physical. What I am saying is there are alternatives to going there each and every time I think something may be wrong. Maybe I just need a “maintenance test” to make sure I am on track with my goals and objectives, why go to the higher cost provider when the alternative, that works is less costly. At least my wallet feels better.

What I'm getting at is that you can help yourself get better (if you really want to) by maybe taking the reins and being your own patient advocate, personally engaged in your care with your care team. I think anyone can and should be the #1 cheerleader for themselves when you need care. Maybe some technology can help with that and that’s what we should look at to help ourselves.  

fragmented-717138_640.jpgThe care fragmentation experienced by patients today is rooted in ineffective transitions of care due to the lack of a shared “patient story and medical records.” Plus, we may have a long term plan of care that can be shared among providers when the patient transitions from one care setting to another. But is it? Or am I in charge of making sure it is. I think it does fall to ourselves to manage the details amongst the different care setting and providers we use. This is speaking to all transitions of care, from hospital to home, to primary care, to specialized practitioners for specific needs in chronic illness. No matter who is taking care of me, do they have “all the info?”

So if there is not “good care coordination” amongst these care teams, and they do not or cannot share information, or the long term care plan, then how can “the plan” be managed to lower the cost of care, and gain a better outcome? It will only happen with ourselves managing the process, until the day of interoperability when all the vendors of medical technology get together and make it happen.

Although it may seem that no one is minding the store when it comes to coordinated long term care planning and interoperability, many groups have been pressing to promote effective communication and coordination across all settings. They include in no particular order, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Quality Strategy, the Institute of Healthcare Improvement and the ‘triple aim’ framework. More “industry experts and associations” could be included - but what’s the point of recreating the list?

So as we see more “virtual health platforms” being built by all kinds of companies, the problem remains the same for the actual providers of care: no money to fund the technology and not enough evidence that proves “Virtual Care” will save time, money and of course gain that better outcome. Although the theory of “virtual care” does claim to save time and money and improve outcomes, but without funding or getting paid for virtual visits, it’s hard for providers to justify the expense.

Patients or consumers were once seen as the ones who were not willing to use this type of medical care technology, but I think that has changed. People of all ages are counting steps and managing what they are eating with smart devices or wearables. They are even taking pills and proving they did with applications that show them swallowing them. So consumers are ready today, it’s just that providers have to find time (which they don’t have much of) to make the decision whether this type of care is required and can help them reach their goals and objectives. It will, but we are not seeing enough movement towards a virtual visit world. Not yet, but I think that worm is turning.  medical-1006787_640.jpg

So where that leaves us this summer is that we need to get physicians, health plans and technology companies working together so we may move healthcare forward, improving public health for everyone. If the conversation is only between payers and providers to deliver on value based care, then how will they fix the issue without technologists at the table? We will still have too many silos if everyone does not start to realize that data is needed across platforms to gain the care coordination that will be required, not only with chronic care patients but with the increasing aging population and with the increase in the total global population. Fewer professional caregivers are coming out of universities today (due to costs?), and more population means better coordination of care (especially chronic care) will be required. We can all use technology to monitor and help guide us with what is happening with our own treatments and care. Applications can help but we will also need access to the many silos of personal medical data that exist about each of us for the care team to gain the better outcome.  

Telehealth technology and virtual care is ready to roll. I feel consumers are ready too. Let’s make sure the message is clear with your own providers and payers of care. The insurers certainly could pay for technology to help lower the costs of care for their populations but, in my opinion, they are not moving quickly enough to help their insured populations with technology options. Maybe we as the people who pay insurance premiums can get them to listen if we all rally together. We need to have everyone focused on the future of health care, and using technology that can reduce costs and provide better outcomes. Our providers will appreciate that as much as we will.

Scott R. Herrmann is the Director of Strategic Solutions at Medocity. He can be reached at sherrmann@medocity.com.

How Can Ankota Help?

If you're a home health agency delivering nursing, PT, OT and Speech Therapy, we can give you the tools to also manage aides and call center personnel and the scheduling capability to optimize across disciplines.  We also offer our Foresight Care service that uses automated phone calls to check in with patients so that you can get early warning signs of preventable hospitalizations.  Please contact us if you would like to learn more.

If you're interested in scheduling a live demo of our software solutions, just click the button below:

Click Here for a Free Demo

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices

Home Health Administrator's Handbook is a Must-Read per Tim Rowan

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jul 26, 2016 12:21:18 PM

Rowan_for_printing.jpgTim Rowen of Home Care Technology Report is a favorite of folks at Ankota, and both Tim and HCTR are invaluable resources for anyone interested in keeping up with innovations in the home care space.Tim did a pretty glowing book review of "Handbook of Home Healthcare Administration" of Home Healthcare Administration."  Tim and his team spent months pouring through this 64-chapter handbook for home health administrators and has given it a big thumbs up.

Highlights from HCTR's Review  

Some highlights pointed out by the HCTR team are as follows:

  • The high level of "KnowMarilyn_D._Harris.jpg How" of the author, Marilyn D. Harris.

    From HCTR: "Marilyn D. Harris recently celebrated her 60th year in home healthcare. She served 22 years as a director of home health and hospice services where her responsibilities included the administrative overview of a nurse-managed health center, a faith community outreach pro
    gram, an animal-assisted therapy program, and other community programs. She has worked with colleagues both domestic and international."

  • The intro covering the state of the industry by Tina Marrelli

  • The technology chapter by Suzanne Sblendorio

  • Finally, the overal message is loud and clear:  Those in the home care and healthcare fields should strongly consider getting this book.

On a related note, Ankota has a new e-book available for download called, Winning with the Home Health Value-Based Purchasing Program, that offers further insight on the discussion.  Just click the link or the picture beow to download.

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If you're interested in scheduling a live demo of our software solutions, just click the button below:

Click Here for a Free Demo

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices

The Right Path to Paying Home Care Caregivers $15/hour or More

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jul 21, 2016 10:30:00 AM

There's been a lot of talk and press about getting home care caregivers to a $15/hour wage, which equates to an annual income of roughly $30,000 per year. There's even a movement called Fight for $15 that is organizing strikes and lobbying efforts to raise the minimum wage. According to this page on payscalecom, the present median hourly wage is $10. The silicon valley darling home care company Honor is paying wages in this range and they're able to do it because they charge more and justify their higher wage with a tech-enabled better experience.  But as long-time home care expert Stephen Tweed points out in this article, a rate increase of this nature would not be affordable to seniors or to Medicaid waiver programs and would likely put home care companies out of business.  I agree that caregivers should be able to receive a living wage, but I don't think that many people will be able to afford Honor, and I agree with Stephen that if we do home care the way that we've always done it and raise the wage to $15, that it won't work.

Maybe We Shouldn't Do it the Way We've Always Done It?

Blockbuster video storeAs a comparison, let's look at the movie rental industry...  There was a time not long ago when we went to Blockbuster to rent videos.  We would go there and browse through shelves of VHS tapes, and later DVDs to see what movie we might want to watch.  There were Blockbusters pretty much everywhere and I'd imagine that the leadership in Blockbuster thought that their business model would live forever. It didn't work out that way and Blockbuster is now gone, replaced by Redbox, Netflix and other on-demand services.  We didn't stop renting videos, we just do it in a different way.

Can we do Home Care a Different Way?

First of all I believe that home care is a fantastic industry that needs to grow and not die, and I would go as far as to say that there is no way that the home care industry can fail.  But by the same token, the movie rental industry didn't fail either - only the video rental store model failed. Skeptics at this point might argue that the failure of Blockbuster and video stores occurred because technology was able to replace people, and that in home care there is no technology that is going to sufficiently help grandma with her bath and toileting.  You'd be right, there is not a way to care for fragile people in their mid-80s and above without people, but I do believe that there's a different way.

How Can We Get to $15 Caregivers?

One way to get to $15/hour caregivers is to change the model of home care from a 1-on-1 experience to shared caregiver experience.  As I've shared a few times, I had knee surgery last summer and was in the hospital for two days.  Over that period of time I had 24-hour care, but the care providers were not in my room for 24 hours. I would hazard a guess that my 24-hour care required less than 2-hours of 1-on-1 care time.  The rest of the time, the care team was helping other patients.

To make this work in home care the concept would be different that it is today.  Instead of sending a caregiver to an individual client's home, what if you sent them to a suburban neighborhood where they could care for numerous clients in a one-mile radius, or in a city to care for multiple elderly clients in the same building.  With a model like this, clients could pay less for their care because other neighbors are paying too, and caregivers can be paid more because there's more money coming in to pay them.  Making this model work would involve a lot of technology because you'd have to look at proximity for emergency support, making sure that caregivers have sufficient breaks, clients are charged fairly based on their acuity and other factors.

TNGCrewSeason2.jpgTying back to the Blockbuster saga, the movies are still the main attraction and what we're paying for.  In this new home care model, the caregivers are still the star of the show and they'll need to do more work during their shift, but ultimately they'll be able to get paid more and have a life outside of work, and we can have an affordable and sustainable care model.

Will Your Home Care Software Take you into the Next Generation?

 

If your home care software company isn't thinking about and talking to you about how you can compete in an age with more clients but fewer caregivers, or if they're thinking that the new models of payment for post-acute care won't affect you, it might be time for new software.  Please contact us if you're ready for next generation home care software. If you're not ready yet, that's fine but consider subscribing to our blog on the upper right of this screen to learn more.

If you're interested in learning more ways to improve revenue, check out our free white paper, Why Care Transitions Is The Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry.  If you're interested in learning more, just click the link to download.

If you're interested in learning more about our home care management software solutions, or about our Care Transitions solutions, just click the button below: 

Click Here for a Free Demo

Ankota_Why Care Transitions is the Next Big Thing in Home Care_White_paper

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care Technology, Care Transitions, August 2016 Newsletter

Longevity is More Related to Health Than to Age

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jul 18, 2016 10:00:00 AM

old-age-957492__340.jpgUniversity of Chicago Study recently concluded that age is not the best predictor of mortality, and instead you should look at the person's healthMore specifically the study looked at mobility, sensory function, mental health and healthy behaviors and concluded that a sedentary isolated 75-year old with a bad diet might be closer to death than an 85-year old salad-eating person who walks with friends everyday.  The study implies that mobility and social engagement are better indicators of longevity than blood pressure and cholesterol.

Sadly, a related NPR story is concluding that baby boomers (the oldest of whom are 70) are going to be sicker seniors that earlier generations.  The NPR story covers a study by the United Health Foundation that compared the 50-64 year old population of today with the same demographic in 1999.  They found significantly more diabetes and obesity, and predicts that 9 percent fewer boomers are going to be likely to report good or excellent health.

What Does this Mean for Home Care?

Based on the above studies, I'd be inclined to search for a home care provider who is going to get my loved one moving and socializing.  Taking this to more of a basic level, you need to be able to answer the question "Why should I choose your agency?"  We've seen and admired agencies who differentiate because of their focus on fall prevention, and seen some agencies who differentiate by providing special treats on holidays.  Your differentiation should ideally be something that you're passionate about.  First and foremost, make sure to differentiate some way

This is one of the habits in our free eBook Seven Habits of Highly Effective Home Care Agencies.  Just click the link or the picture to download!

If you're interested in scheduling a live demo of our software solutions, just click the button below:

Click Here for a Free Demo

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Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 
If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, August 2016 Newsletter

7 Deadly Sins of Going it Alone when Starting a Home Care Agency

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jul 14, 2016 8:30:00 AM

 One of the industry experts I learn from every time we speak is Ginny Kenyon, principal at Kenyon Home Care Consulting.  Ginny helps open home care agencies and has given Ankota great inputs on our software.  We at Ankota strongly believe that keeping elderly people healthy and comfortable in their homes (and out of the hospital) is an important step in the evolution of healthcare.  Ginny is one of the pioneers driving moves in home health delivery.  Enjoy her post (below).

Starting a new homecare agency or launching a new business line in your existing organization can be a tricky process. There are layers upon layers of details to handle, and going about it on your own leads to frustration and, oftentimes, failure. In this article, we’ll focus on seven deadly sins of starting homecare without professional help. Many homecare owners unknowingly commit these mistakes when attempting to start a new organization or business line alone.starting homecare

 Starting Homecare Without Help 

No one ever means to sin—it’s simply human nature. But when it comes to launching a new homecare agency or business line,there’s something you can do about it. Here are the seven deadly sins that a professional consultant helps you avoid.

1. Failing to Establish Effective Processes

Without the right procedures in place and easily accessible to all staff, situations can quickly turn into chaos. Start your agency off on the right foot by establishing detailed processes for every aspect of your business.

An experienced homecare professional guides you in the right direction to define and refine which processes will work best for your particular agency type or new business line.

2. Ignoring the Needs of Your Community

Your efforts will be wasted if no one in the community benefits from your services. But it’s not always easy to know exactly what your neighbors need or want. Working with an expert familiar with your area’s demographics and the homecare industry gives a better understanding of which services to offer.

3. Stealing Your Staff’s Future

Of course you don’t intend to steal the hopes and dreams of your team members. But that’s exactly what happens when you fail to provide the best training and education needed to provide excellent care while advancing their careers. To give your staff unsurpassed knowledge, consider an online education program run by industry experts.

4. Breaking the Policies and Procedures Commandments

Part of creating a successful homecare organization is obtaining complete up to date policies and procedures manuals. These manuals must include federal and state regulations and accreditation standards necessary for compliance and superb client care. If you’re not sure of all that must be included to be industry compliant, work with a professional to customize manuals for your agency.

5. Disobeying the Law

Legal regulations are a source of irritation for most of the homecare industry. But they are absolutely necessary to ensure quality care, to weed out any “bad apples,” and to continue to grow your business.

Unfortunately, this is no easy task since each state has different regulations. A homecare consultant knows what’s required in your state and is able to help your agency be compliant.

6. Practicing Poor Ethics

Being ethical in business is always important, but it’s even more crucial when you work with the sick and elderly. Making sure your staff knows the correct principled way to provide client care and what’s improper is vital. An industry expert understands how to help your agency avoid unwanted ethical issues.

7. Being Stuck in Your Old Ways

Probably one of the biggest reasons for homecare failure is the lack of willingness to change. When starting homecare or a new business line, your consultant will guide your decisions, encourages you to be flexible and helps you see how change leads to new opportunities.

At Kenyon HomeCare Consulting, we will support every aspect of your starting homecare journey. From marketing to policies and procedures, we have the experience necessary to prevent you from committing any of these seven deadly sins of starting homecare without professional help. Reach out to us to schedule a time to learn more!

This article, 7 DEADLY SINS OF STARTING HOMECARE WITHOUT PROFESSIONAL HELP first appeared in Kenyon HomeCare Consulting blog.

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One of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Selling Care Transition Services to Hospitals" is available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

Selling_Care_Transition_Services_to_Hospitals_Cover.png

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Transitions, Ginny Kenyon, August 2016 Newsletter

4 Takeaways from a United Health Foundation Study

Posted by Jed Hammel on Jul 11, 2016 10:30:00 AM

The United Health Foundation recently published an in-depth study on the health of seniors in the U.S.  Here's the link for the entire report, but as a start, here's a quick rundown taken from the report to help whet your appetite:

"The 2016 America’s Health Rankings® Senior Report provides a comprehensive analysis of senior population health on a national and state-by-state basis across 35 measures of senior health. Now in its fourth year, it continues to serve as a resource for individuals, community leaders, policymakers, public health officials, and the media to benchmark each state’s performance on key measures ofUS-Healthcare-Scorecard-successes.png health and wellness for the senior population."

The study reveals a number of findings that some of us may find surprising, while for others, the findings may reinforce what they already experienced.  

Again, I strongly suggest reading the full report here, as there are too many key takeaways to share, but here are a few as a start:

  • Preventable Hospitalizations are Down 9%

  • Teeth Extractions in Seniors is Down 8%

  • Hip Fractures in Seniors are Down 5%

  • Home Health Care Up 18%

As you can probably surmise, health care and home care will continue to work together in the future.  

Our white paper, Why Care Transitions Is The Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry addresses this from a bit of a different angle.  If you're interested in learning more, just click the link to download.

If you're interested in learning more about our home care management software solutions, or about our Care Transitions component as a way to increase revenue, just click the button below: 

Click Here for a Free Demo

Ankota_Why Care Transitions is the Next Big Thing in Home Care_White_paper

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care Technology, Care Transitions

What Caregivers Should Know About the Elderly and Their Health

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jul 7, 2016 10:00:00 AM

Today's guest blogger is Rachelle Wilber (see her bio below)

Some people believe that healthcare is a universal right, while others disagree. One thing is for certain - better education can lead to a healthier, more productive life. People, (especially the elderly) who are educated about how their body works, and what things affect them, can more easily avoid sickness and properly treat illnesses that come up. After all, having a better chance of increasing their own state of wellness makes it easier to keep them healthy. Taking a quick look at a few things that be of great benefit to a patient’s health in the later stages of life can be a great source of help and ideas.

Delicate Balance

Home_Care_Education.pngAll health is delicate, but the health of the elderly can sometimes be a little bit more tricky. When it comes to the elderly, healthcare still hinges on education. When dealing with a patient that has a condition or specific ailments, it’s important to learn as much about their medical background as possible. Asking them about their health over the years can yield some information to go off of. However, their concrete medical background can yield crucial information that they may not remember. After all, no one of any age can remember their entire medical history. With their permission, take an in-depth look at their medical history to ascertain what would be the best treatment plan for them. For instance, if someone was a former smoker and has COPD symptoms, it may be best to treat them in a similar manner. Of course, consult with your colleagues and advisors to determine what the best course of action for their individual situation would be.

Educating the Elderly

educate.jpgThe aged are especially vulnerable to illness and disease unfortunately. They are exposed to more bacteria and viruses due to being in close quarters with other residents or patients. Their immune systems can sometimes be a little delicate and therefore, sickness can be more prevalent and common. There is already a well-understood need to educate them about general matters concerning their health, but more should be done to educate them about specific areas of their own health that they have control over. Educating them about the health of their communities is also important. For instance, obesity is a topic of concern for many people, and here in America, people aren't given more healthy food choices and adequate opportunities to exercise. Educating the elderly about their exercise options can make them happier, healthier, and help them feel more like themselves.

Preventative Care

The general trend in medicine is to treat conditions after they have manifested symptoms. Often times, it's already too late to reverse the course of bad habits and certain illnesses that weren't dealt with at early stages. This is especially important to consider when it comes to older folks’ health. Make sure they aren’t putting off medical care until there is an absolute emergency at hand. An individual who has an RN or MSN degree explain the importance of preventative care can really help overarching healthcare concerns. The failure to recognize medical issues due to a lack of education is inexcusable in our modern society. There is a saying - "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." This statement rings true when more people are educated about common illnesses and the importance of preventative healthcare.

Education leads to cures. Scientists and medical professionals study ways to prevent and better treat illnesses on a daily basis. Yet, the average person can also use education as a tool to enhance their quality of life. The elderly deserve a better quality of life, and it’s up to their medical personnel to give them the tools to do so. Knowledge is power, especially when health is concerned.

Today's guest blogger is Rachelle Wilber.  Rachelle is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor's Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn't on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Rachelle recommends researching an RN to MSN online degree for more information. Follow her on Twitter (@RachelleWilber) and Facebook.

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If you're interested in scheduling a live demo of our software solutions, just click the button below or to read about other suggestions od how to differenntiate your business, click the image below to receive "7 Habits of Private Duty Home Care Agencies":

Click Here for a Free Demo

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Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 
If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, August 2016 Newsletter

7 Reasons Why You Should Choose Care at Home

Posted by Ken Accardi on Jul 5, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Today's guest post is by Maggie Drag.  About the author: Maggie Drag is an owner and founder of a homecare agency located in central Connecticut. With over 27 years of experience in the industry, Maggie shares her knowledge and tips about care at home.  Visit homecare4u.com to learn more about Maggie Drag.  Enjoy Maggie's article and feel free to comment below!

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There is a number of significant reasons why you should invest in care at home for your loved ones. In-home care offers, one on one care to your loved one and peace of mind for your family.  Here are 7 reasons why you should choose care at home:

Professional Care

Depending on the person’s condition, there are cases when friends or family members are not able to provide the proper care. For example, dementia or Alzheimer’s requires intensive professional training and experience working with such patients. It can be dificult for family or friends to devote the time in proper training, attending classes, and balance their already busy life. If your loved one has the need for special equipment or medication reminder, a skilled in-home caregiver will be there to help as well.

Continuous Coverage

Without care provider, you won’t be able to guarantee that someone is always there for your loved one. If an emergency occurs, what will you do? What if you don’t feel well? What if you want to go for vacation or even simple grocery shopping? With a live-in or hourly home care, your loved ones are in safe hands 24/7. 

A Friendly and Safe Home Environment

What other place is safer and cozier than the home? Being home lets the person in need feel more comfortable and independent. In fact, medical evidence shows that care at home helps to recover faster.  Having a loved one in a nursing home or specialized care facility can be tough for both sides: limited visiting hours, different environment, and unfamiliar food. Home is the best place for your family to come and visit during holidays and any other times. 

Time for Yourself and Your Work

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Choosing in home care allows you give time to yourself, your family, and your job.  Everyone needs a break sometime!

 One On One Care

No other method of care, other than one on one, will provide as much attention and thorough care as in home.  One on one care provides comfort and safety, no matter where you are. Even simple chores and daily routine are fitted exclusively for the person’s needs. 

That WOW Cost

If you haven’t done the research yet, you may be surprised to find out how much nursing homes or facilities charge per day. To give you some idea, the costs can range from $400 to $700 per day if not more! Staying at home and hiring in-home care provider saves families more than 50% of the total cost.

Nutritious and Healthy Home Made Meals

Proper nutrition is especially important for people with diagnosis like diabetes, congestive heart failure, and stroke. In-home care attendants help in meal preparation while making sure the diet and nutrition intake are properly followed according to the needs.

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One of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Selling Care Transition Services to Hospitals" is available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

Selling_Care_Transition_Services_to_Hospitals_Cover.png

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Transitions, August 2016 Newsletter

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About Ankota

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

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