The Ankota Healthcare Delivery Management Blog

3 Tips for Improving Your Home Care Agency's Marketing and Sales

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 27, 2017 3:55:00 PM

blue-funnel-946886_640.jpgIn her article, Move the Funnel to a Loop: 3 Ways that Marketing’s Role in Healthcare Must Change and Why  Erinne Kovi Dyer offers 3 suggestions for how to build and maintain your sales funnel in Healthcare.  I feel that the topics and approach Kovi Dyer presents in the piece are in alignment with and helpful to those in the home care and home health space.  

I suggest that you read the entire article,but one passage from the article really stood out for me:

"Your goal is not to sell – it’s to communicate and engage. Everyone in the health system is a steward of the customer journey, an advocate for patient experiences at every step. To successfully engage consumers and build loyalty, you need to be an empathic educator, an innovative communicator and a masterful collaborator both within your organization and your community."

Again, please read the article in order to get the full picture, but as a start, here are the three tips covered in the piece:

  • Start thinking differently about our roles, our tools, our capabilities, our skills and our teams.

  • Work just as vigorously to retain and engage patients as we do to “fill the funnel” with new patients.

  • Commit to understanding the goals of the system and establish partnerships from within (and from the outside) in order to make them a reality.

 What are your thoughts?  Are their any tips or suggestions that you would add to the list?  Please feel free to leave a comment in our comment section!

On the topic of selling, one of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Selling Care Transition Services to Hospitals" is available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

Selling_Care_Transition_Services_to_Hospitals_Cover.png

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, March 2017 Newsletter

How To Get Startup Home Care Business Support

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 22, 2017 1:34:00 PM

 One of the industry experts I learn from every time we speak is Ginny Kenyon, principal at Kenyon Home Care Consulting.  Ginny helps open home care agencies and has given Ankota great inputs on our software.  We at Ankota strongly believe that keeping elderly people healthy and comfortable in their homes (and out of the hospital) is an important step in the evolution of healthcare.  Ginny is one of the pioneers driving moves in home health delivery.  Enjoy her post (below).

 

Start up Homecare Business

Whether you’re considering a startup home care business or you want to expand your current services, the road is often paved with speed bumps. You need the right support in order to see your dreams realized. In this article, we’ll discuss how getting help from a homecare expert is beneficial.

Support for Your Startup Home Care Business

Is it possible to succeed in the home care industry on your own? Sure, but there will be many obstacles along the way.

Working with a professional consultant is a sure-fire way to overcome those obstacles with ease and speed. Thereby helping your dreams become a reality faster with fewer expenses and less stress. Here’s how!

1. Help Getting the Required Tools

Yikes, startups must have employee handbooks, forms and the all important home care manuals. The amount of documents needed for running a thriving—and compliant—home care agency seems to be endless. Going it alone means you’re responsible for creating or compiling these documents, and for finding all the information required for each one.

Instead of spending hours upon hours researching, writing, and editing documents, consider purchasing customizable products from a trusted industry expert. A professional who know exactly what’s required for your business and has experience crafting the documents you need. This helps speed up the process for your startup or new business line so you can focus on other pressing matters.

2. Accreditation and State Licensure Preparedness

Before you can open the doors of your startup home care business, you must be licensed and, depending on your business plan, accredited. An experienced consultant leads you in the right direction, helping you with obtaining your license and becoming accredited.

Through policy revisions, on-site evaluations, and mock surveys, your home care consultant will guide you toward 100 percent preparedness for licensure and accreditation.

3. Industry Knowledge and Professionalism

A world of information is at your feet whether you’re brand new in the home care industry or attempting to grow or save your organization. But wading through all the available info is time-consuming and stressful.

Expert consultants gain extensive knowledge through working with startups and expansions of all sizes and types. They’re in the know about regulations for each type of agency and can steer you towards what works and away from what doesn’t.

4. Hiring and Orientation Assistance

One of the most stressful aspects of a startup home care business is finding the right team to support your goals. The hiring and training process is exhausting, but a trusted expert helps you streamline the process. Thus ensuring you hire people who truly fit your agency’s culture.

Once you’ve secured a team, it’s important to provide sufficient training and orientation. The right consultant offers guidance and tools for turning your employees into an elite staff.

5. Software Expertise

Selecting software that meets all the needs of your startup home care business is a crucial part of success. From client care to billing and scheduling, efficient software is paramount. It helps to keep your organization’s operations running smoothly with as little headache as possible.

When you partner with a knowledgeable home care expert, you receive advice and guidance on choosing the software that best fits your agency’s requirements.

6. Help with All Things Coding

Accurate and efficient coding is vital to the success of your startup home care business. When done correctly, it can mean higher reimbursement for your agency, but when coding falters, so does your revenue.

Obtaining a coding outsourcing partner is a great option for making sure there are minimal errors before billing or submitting claims. It prevents you from needing certified coders and provides documentation and coding education for staff. All while ensuring you receive maximum reimbursements!

7. Guidance for Staff Education

Many home care consulting firms, provide compliant, industry specific staff education and training. This education fulfills requirements, enhances client care, improves employee satisfaction, and sets you apart from the competition.

Kenyon HomeCare Consulting and Your Startup Home Care Business

At Kenyon HomeCare Consulting, we offer everything outlined here, and more. Our consultants are experienced, professional, and knowledgeable. And our Aide University program is the only online continuing education program of its kind.  Schedule an appointment now to speak with one of our experts!

 

 

This article entitled, HOW TO GET STARTUP HOME CARE BUSINESS SUPPORT first appeared in Kenyon HomeCare Consulting blog.

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One of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies" available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

7_habits_effective_home_care.jpg

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Transitions, Ginny Kenyon

3 Ways to Protect Your Home Care Clients from a Recent Phone Scam

Posted by Jed Hammel on Feb 20, 2017 9:41:00 AM

 

telephone-1055044__480.jpgA recent article from the WEAU Channel 13 News reported about a new phone scam targeting a wide range of folks that you might want to alert your elder care clients to. 

I suggest that you read the entire report here, but as a start, here are some takeaways:

"For the last few days of January, more than half of the reports to BBB Scam Tracker have been about this one scam...You get a call from someone who almost immediately asks “Can you hear me?” Their goal is to get you to answer “Yes,” which most people would do instinctively in that situation. There may be some fumbling around; the person may even say something like “I’m having trouble with my headset.” But in fact, the “person” may just be a robocall recording your conversation… and that “Yes” answer you gave can later be edited to make it sound like you authorized a major purchase."

The article goes on to suggest the following steps we can take to protect ourselves and those in our care from becoming a victim of the scam, as follows:

• Use Caller ID to screen calls, and consider not even answering unfamiliar numbers. If it’s important, they will leave a message and you can call back.

• If someone calls and asks “Can you hear me?”, do NOT answer “yes.” Just hang up. Scammers change their tactics as the public catches on, so be alert for other questions designed to solicit a simple “yes” answer.

• Check your bank and credit card statements regularly for unauthorized charges. It’s also a good idea to check your telephone and cell phone bills, as well. Scammers may be using the “Yes” recording of your voice to authorize charges on your phone. This is called “cramming” and it’s illegal.

As scammers become more savvy, we need to be sure to be aware of their latest tactics and to help spread the word to help us all avoid falling victims to these ruses.

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Ankota has a new e-book available for download called, Winning with the Home Health Value-Based Purchasing Program, that offers further insight on the discussion.  Just click the link or the picture beow to download.

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If you're interested in scheduling a live demo of our software solutions, just click the button below:

Click Here for a Free Demo

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices

Using a Blog to Grow Your Home Care Business

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 15, 2017 11:11:00 AM

Today's article is by Jason Chagnon from Providentia Marketing.  Jason and Providentia's goals are to help to drive client referrals and attract caregivers to your agency.  He writes on how to utilize regular blog content to build your business.  Enjoy his post (below).

sapling - growth.pngAs your home care business grows, your to-do list likely includes networking, advertising, recruiting and generating leads and referrals. All of these tasks warrant your time and your best efforts. But if you really want to maximize the results of your work, you must have a blog. Now you might be thinking “Really? Do I need a blog?” The answer is NO. You don’t NEED a website either. In fact, you don’t really need a sales staff or home care software for that matter. You get the point. If you really want to be successful and grow to your full potential, a blog is a must have!

Why Should Your Company Blog?

The list of benefits of blogging is a long one, but most benefits fall into two categories: branding and lead generation. As you blog, you’re providing valuable information to your current and potential clients. Essentially you’re adding value to your services by giving readers information free of charge, as well as giving clients a piece of who you are as a company and what you stand for. Your blog also establishes your business as an authority and expert in the home care industry. This in turn elevates your credibility and bolsters your reputation, both of which are encouraging to potential clients shopping for home care services.

Blog posts are also a great opportunity for self-promotion. Each blog post will have a subject that ties in with your services in one way or another. For example, if you write about the various responsibilities of home care workers, you could mention that your home care employees receive ongoing training and are well equipped to provide the services you discussed.

If that’s not enough to convince you, maybe some statistics will. According to Hubspot, companies who blog receive 97% more links to their website (meaning more potential clients). Plus, marketers who have prioritized blogging are 13 times more likely to enjoy positive ROI (more profits). Aabaco Small Business says that small businesses that blog get 126% more lead growth than small businesses that do not.

What Should You Write / Blog About?

Now that you’ve decided to seriously consider blogging, what topics should you cover? The possibilities are endless, but it is always a good idea to discuss industry news, innovations or any legislation that impacts home care. You can also use your blog as a platform to announce company news, events, new services or new employees. Your readers are likely reading your blog because they either use your services, or could potentially do so, so they will appreciate being kept in the loop about what is going on in your home care business. Finally, any tips and advice you can offer readers is valuable to them.

Example Ideas for Tips and Advice:

  • How to decide if a family member needs home care

  • How to discuss home care with a loved one

  • How to determine which home care service is right for your mother

How Can You Promote Your Blog?

Once your blog is up and running, you need to tell people it exists so that they can check it out! Your blog should have a link on your website (preferably in a main menu or header) so that readers can easily access it. Your next step is to announce your blog on all of the social media accounts that you created after reading our last post!  This allows your followers to read the news firsthand—don’t forget to provide a link that goes directly to your blog. Don’t be afraid to post this every few days, as a reminder to read your posts. You can also pay social media sites to promote your post that announces your blog. This ensures that more people will see the post. Of course, don’t forget that word of mouth has a lot of value, so let all of your employees, clients and referral sources know. Tell anyone and everyone that your company now has a blog. 

7 Ways Blogging Helps Your Home Care Agency

  • Blogging increases traffic to your home care website.
  • Blogging improves your rankings on search sites like Google, Bing and Yahoo.
  • Blogging helps with social media marketing by providing more content to share.
  • Blogging demonstrates your expertise in home care services.
  • Blogging helps your sales team by giving them more to share and talk about.
  • Blogging informs your caregivers by keeping them updated.
  • Blogging educates your clients by giving them tips and advice.

If you are not sure where to begin, give us a call at Providentia Marketing. We can help your home care company start a blog and can even provide content to keep it relevant and current. Even if you want to do it yourself, we would be happy to talk to you and point you in the right direction.

This article, USING A BLOG TO GROW YOUR HOME CARE BUSINESS, first appeared in the Providentia Marketing blog.

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One of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies" available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

7_habits_effective_home_care.jpg

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Transitions, Ginny Kenyon, March 2017 Newsletter

Education: Proven Key To Health Care Organizational Success

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 13, 2017 10:13:00 AM

 One of the industry experts I learn from every time we speak is Ginny Kenyon, principal at Kenyon Home Care Consulting.  Ginny helps open home care agencies and has given Ankota great inputs on our software.  We at Ankota strongly believe that keeping elderly people healthy and comfortable in their homes (and out of the hospital) is an important step in the evolution of healthcare.  Ginny is one of the pioneers driving moves in home health delivery.  Enjoy her post (below).

All administrators in health care acknowledge that education is one of the keys to assuring quality care.  Educated staff are more effective and this ultimately leads to reduced costs for the entire health care system.

Health Care Education of the Past

Chronic Disease Educations

Fifty years ago, when I first started nursing, Registered Nurses (RNs) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) were the focus of education as they were caring for patients at the bedside.  Nurses, as the primary care staff occurred in hospitals, nursing homes and home health.  Both home health and nursing homes had aides, but there were no standardized training requirements and each agency or organization developed and trained as they saw fit.  RNs and LPNs were still the primary caregivers in these areas.  But in the late 1980s, Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), now called Center for Medicare/Medicaid Services (CMS), established basic training for all aides. Training and certification in fundamentals of care, was now a requirement for all aides in federally funded agencies. Then as now, very little education about diseases or care specific to individuals with primarily chronic diseases is thought necessary.

Is Health Care Education Any Different Today?

Fast forward to today.  RNs and LPNs are no longer the primary caregivers at the bedside, particularly in nursing homes and home health.  The Certified Nursing Assistant or aide is the primary caregiver working under the direction of the RN or LPN. Yet they still receive only minimal training and education in the most basic fundamentals of care.

Over the last ten years the readmission rate for hospitals, home health and nursing homes has been climbing. The data indicates that many of the readmissions are due to chronic disease. Some agencies or facilities have managed to reduce those rates with restructuring their delivery system, yet a total reduction eludes everyone.

When looking at data, the one missing link seems to be adequate aide education or lack thereof.  To address this issue, Kenyon Consulting developed a series of WA DSHS certified eight-hour chronic disease specific courses, appropriate for both aide and nursing education. While the initial focus was on aides, we soon learned the courses were equally valuable educational tools for RNs and LPNs.

Education Test Subjects

To test to see if chronic disease education would have an impact on care and reduce readmission rates, staff caring for patients on a nursing home subacute care wing agreed to test 2 courses, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Congestive Heart Failure (CHF).  The sample group of 32 full time staff includes RNs, LPNs and aides. For the first half of 2015 prior to completing the courses, the readmission rate for this unit was 32. Of the patients readmitted from the pilot unit, 13 were due to CHF and 3 for COPD. For the entire 164 bed facility, the readmission rate totaled 57 for the same time period.  Since 50% of all readmissions were for the two diagnosis of CHF and COPD, all 32 caregivers were to complete and pass CHF and COPD online courses to receive certification.

Chronic Disease Education and Hospital Readmission Results

Course completion and CHF and COPD certification occurred in June, July, and August of 2015. Data shows a decrease in hospital readmissions for the subacute wing during that quarter. By the end of the next quarter through December 2015, only 15 subacute readmissions were recorded with none for COPD or CHF. However, an unexpected result showed the entire facility experienced a marked reduction in hospital readmissions. Facility total readmissions for the last two quarters of 2015 was 29, with all 2015 readmissions equaling 87.

Nursing home data for 2016 indicates readmission reductions continue. From January through December 2016, only 27 readmissions occurred on the subacute wing, with none for COPD or CHF. During the same time, the entire facility also saw a reduction in readmissions totaling 71 or 13.4% for the entire year of 2016, with only one patient admission for COPD.

Chronic Disease Education Effects More Than Hospital Readmissions

The data demonstrates a significant benefit in educating all caregivers. However, to really improve care, all members of the caregiving team need chronic disease education. Nurses report that current education greatly updates their baseline knowledge. Aides report that the learning initially was difficult because the subject matter was entirely new.  We found it best for nurse educators to be available as aides complete their course work to assist with questions and areas difficult to understand. This is particularly true for aides for whom English is a second language.

After course completion, the aides expressed feeling much better prepared to care for the patients with COPD and CHF diagnoses. And all wanted to know when they could take other online courses! Management staff reported staff morale improvements. But best of all, readmission results prove that advanced chronic disease education, makes a difference in quality of the care!

Kenyon and Chronic Disease Management

At Kenyon HomeCare Consulting, we make it simple for you to provide chronic disease management training. Aide University online courses deliver the knowledge and tools necessary for caregivers with to provide expert care to clients suffering from one or more debilitating conditions.

Give us a call at 206-721-5091 or schedule a time at your convenience to learn more about our chronic disease education program.

This article entitled, EDUCATION: PROVEN KEY TO HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONAL SUCCESS first appeared in Kenyon HomeCare Consulting blog.

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One of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies" available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

7_habits_effective_home_care.jpg

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Transitions, Ginny Kenyon, March 2017 Newsletter

5 Ways to Avoid Asthma Triggers in Home Care Patients

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 8, 2017 11:54:00 AM

Today's guest post comes from Dixie Somers, a freelance writer from Arizona. Please enjoy Dixie's article.

Asthma.jpgWhen serving in the role of caregiver, it’s essential that you be aware of all the medical issues of a patient. You may be coming into the home to provide home and health care services while someone is going through a rehabilitation process or when a cognitive impairment makes them unable to care for themselves. If that patient has asthma, you will need to take steps to prevent reactions in your patient.

Personal Habits

Smoking is detrimental to your health and to the health of those around you. If you are a smoker, quitting will be beneficial to your current and future health. You should refrain from smoking during the time you are in a home providing care giving services.

Fragrances

Perfumes, scented lotions and clothing that retains the scent from dryer sheets can trigger asthmatic reactions in people who are sensitive to fragrances. It’s best to avoid wearing any type of perfume while on the job. It’s also essential that you use unscented lotion and personal care products yourself and with your patient.

Outdoor Allergy Triggers

While taking a patient outside for some fresh air or to soak up some sunshine may seem like a good idea, it isn’t always a positive experience for someone with asthma. You need to be keenly aware of air quality conditions before taking a patient outside. Asthma triggers change as the seasons change, so you’ll need to be very selective regarding outdoor activities. Air pollution from factories, cars and other sources can also adversely affect those who are sensitive to pollutants. Foggy days, humidity and other weather-related aspects can play a role in how profound outdoor pollution is in a certain area.

Food Allergies

If part of your caregiving responsibility involves preparing meals for the patient, you must be aware of any foods that could cause acid reflux or heartburn. These can be a trigger for asthmatic reactions.

Pets

If you have pets, be sure to keep clothing or uniforms that you wear to work in a location in your home that your pet doesn’t have access to. Don’t pick your pet up and hold it against you before leaving for work. In doing so, you can inadvertently carry pet allergens into the home of your patient.

Awareness and prevention are vital when working with patients with asthma. Consult with an expert like Aerospan RX if you have questions. You’ll want to take all steps possible to prevent triggering an asthma reaction in a patient.

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One of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Selling Care Transition Services to Hospitals" is available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

Selling_Care_Transition_Services_to_Hospitals_Cover.png

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Transitions, November 2016 Newsletter

Applying "Nana Technology" in Home Care

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 6, 2017 2:09:00 PM

 

Today's title is not a typo but rather a play on words. Nanotechnology is used to manipulate atoms and molecules in the 1 to 100 nanometer scale. While this and other leading edge technology is amazing, we in the home care world need to deal with technologies that our average 83 year old client can handle. Today's post was written by Audrey Kinsella and originally appeared in Tim Rowan's Home Care Technology Report on 11/30/2016. I have known and admired Tim Rowan for many years and highly recommend that you subscribe to his Home Care Technology Report newsletter. I met Audrey in Boston and the same conference that inspired her article. Audrey is great and I look forward to reading more of her works in the future.

I remember it as though it were yesterday. imgres-1.jpgIt was the great Gene Tischer, former Executive Director of the Home Care Association of Florida, who taught me a memorable lesson years ago, as he did many audiences large and small over the years. An audience member had asked him, "Gene, what’s the best option for eldercare now? Nursing Homes? Assisted Living Facilities? Home care?” He said, "Have adult daughters." I walked away shaking my head. I have one son.

I was reminded of Gene's advice last month as one of the exhibits at the Partners Health annual "Connected Health" symposium caught my eye. MedSentry™ bills itself as "The Prescription for Medication Adherence." The Westborough, Massachusetts company offers a modular medication management system designed for patients with a high number of prescriptions. Booth personnel explained to me that the system features custom medication packaging, cloud-based pharmacist management, imaging technology, and compartments that can manage a dozen medications or more.

When I asked whether the dispenser was mobile, they told me the story of one devoted daughter who prepared he elderly mother's dispensary every month with 12 different prescriptions drugs that had to be taken at varying times of the day. Once filled, the mother was able to self-manage when she was at home and when she visited other family members, often for days or weeks at a time.

After telling me that story, they quoted a clinical validation study that had been conducted by Partners' Center for Connected Health and Massachusetts General Hospital. It found a 9% hospitalization rate among MedSentry™ users and a 50% rate for all-cause hospitalizations in the control group and a 36% rate of hospitalizations for heart failure.

Is Homebound a Healthy Goal?

I concluded, after my time in Boston, that seniors who live at home, get out more often, and remain active, are becoming more common. Connected technologies are making passive seniors obsolete, regardless of their chronic conditions. Robust new wearables help them share health data with their doctors and nurses. They are able to be more engaged with their care, even while away from home.

At all times, keynote speakers and product vendors returned to the theme that the technology must be usable to be worthwhile. Ease-of-use features were constantly cited as the key to new tools helping patients educate themselves and chart their own progress as they age. As mobile health tools evolve, they move in the direction of being easily used by people of all ages. That does not mean the adult daughter is not still critical. She may be able to use the tools more confidently.

Help May Be Near at Hand

senior-1559369__340.jpgThe old joke comes full circle. When mobile computers were new and CMS first began requiring electronic forms and claims submission, Healthcare at Home agency staff often balked. "I will never be able to learn how to use this gadget," they often said. The helpful manager would often reply, "Don't you have an 11 year-old at home? She can teach you."

Fast-forward to 2016 and that built-in 1980's computer instructor may now very well be the person filling the retired home health worker's MedSentry™ dispenser.

Enable the 24/7 Caregivers

Coaching elders in technology use and engaging them in their own care are key to teaching self-management routines and keeping them at home, where they prefer to live. Ease-of-use features benefit these adult daughters as much as they do their elderly parents with multiple chronic conditions. Consequently, keeping seniors engaged in self-management may begin with coaching adult daughters, who, as Gene Tischer taught us years ago, are becoming essential to both their elderly parents and their parents' care team.

As presenter Lauren Costantini, PhD, CEO of Prime-Temp, Inc., indicated in his keynote address, "Wearable Sensors Expand Human Potential," "We should not look at today's monitoring devices as "technologies in search of a problem." Rather, we must embrace them as "technologies as a service for life." This is the new and different patient we as an industry are soon to meet. Not the dependent, homebound person but the active, independent senior, living well at home -- and everywhere else -- thanks to tools that enable self-management of chronic conditions.

Audrey Kinsella, MA, MS, is HCTR's telemedicine reporter. She has written on home telehealthcare and new technologies for home care service delivery for 20 years, in 6 books, multiple web sites, and more than 150 published articles. Audrey can be reached at audreyk3@charter.net or 828-348-5308.

Simplifying Telehealth Technology for Elder Care

Another technology that is not as advanced as nanotechnology but still difficult for elderly patients is teleheath. This technology, generally focused on collecting vital signs, is often hard to connect to the Internet and difficult for elderly people to use. One of Ankota's innovations is called Foresight Care.

This solution check's in with elderly people that have health and social risks simply by calling them on the phone and having them respond by pushing buttons on their touch-tone keypad. The questions are simple and the calls are designed to take around a minute. Health systems are looking for affordable ways to reduce emergency room visits for the elderly patients who you care for. If you'd like to learn more about how Foresight Care can help your agency prevent avoidable hospitalizations at low cost, please let us know.

Learn More About Reducing Readmissions  with Foresight Care  

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, March 2017 Newsletter

3 Types of In-Home Care Clients and How to Best Serve Them

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 1, 2017 3:51:00 PM

Today's guest post is from Hannah Whittenly.  Hannah is a freelance writer and mother of two from Sacramento, CA. She enjoys kayaking and reading books by the lake.

hands-216981__480.jpgNo matter what profession you choose, there are bound to be different types of people you have to learn how to best interact with.  Working in the home healthcare or in-home nursing field you come across a variety people, and having specific approaches to best interact with each can help both you and the client or patient.

Clients are individuals, and each have their own unique outlook, style, and needs.  That said, the following are four types of clients that you might interact with and tips to help you do so.

The Rebel

The Rebels can be an adventure to interact with. These folks might miss appointments without telling you or they may simply avoid listening to your recommendations.  My advice is to be direct with them; for example, often, you can start by simply stating that the appoinments and recommendations as part of their care plan are the best ways for them to promote their own health.

Upset Patient

Because patients are typically going through a lot of life changes in regards to both their health and way of life, it’s understandable that they might not be in their best mindset.  Their emotions can run the gammut. The upset patient may be suffering from a chronic illness or an ailment that has stayed around for some time. Their stress could possibly even be from feeling and realizing that they are no longer in control of their own life. It is important that you do not take their emotions personally. Do your best to be compassionate about your patient or client's situation. Try to establish a peaceful environment by showing that you care. This can be done by engaging in active listening and using a tender voice to appease the upset patient.

The Lovely Ones

Great patients are the most common type of patients, but they are a little dangerous for medical professionals. Why? Well, great patients are usually pleasant and warm. It is very easy to get attached to them, which could compromise your objectivity. Keep in mind that objectivity is precious to a medical professional, especially when you need to be honest rather than overly optimistic.

Knowing what type of patient you’re dealing with and how to best approach them can be very valuable in any medical career field. Of course, if you already work as a nurse or doctor, you probably already know this. If you have yet to pursue this career path and would be interested in a medical career and working with the various types of patients, you can learn more here.

No matter where you go in the healthcare world, learning how to properly interact with patients is crucial. Hopefully, these suggestions have prepared you for that. If done right, it can definitely be one of the most rewarding experiences of your life!

For more food for thought, Ankota has a new e-book available for download called, Winning with the Home Health Value-Based Purchasing Program, that offers further insight on the discussion.  Just click the link or the picture beow to download.

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If you're interested in scheduling a live demo of our software solutions, just click the button below:

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Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, March 2017 Newsletter

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About Ankota

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

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