<img alt="" src="http://www.qpwoei2.com/100802.png" style="display:none;">

Ankota: Ushering in the Next Generation of Homecare Blog

An Evolving Profession: a Quick Look at the Modern Development of Nursing

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 18, 2017 11:00:00 AM

Over the past 150 years or so, the nursing profession has changed enormously. At one time it was a a limited vocation. It’s now a respected career for thousands of dedicated, trained and well-educated people of both genders. If you’re attracted to nursing as a career, take a few minutes to think about how it’s evolved, as well as some more current trends.

Lady with the Lamp

For most of history, nursing was done in the home by family members. It wasn’t even recognized as a distinct profession. Many people feel that modern nursing began with social activist Florence Nightingale. During the Crimean War of 1853-1856, the British government asked for her help managing the deplorable conditions in their field hospitals.

Along with a band of compatriots, she saw to it that practices for sanitation, fresh air, healthy food, and distribution of medicine were followed. An admiring world saw the wisdom in Nightingale’s insistence on the need for trained and experienced nurses. The first nursing school in the U.S. opened its doors in 1873.

Hospital Era

Over the ensuing decades, urban populations soared and infectious illnesses became a universal threat. Civilian and medical authorities saw the need for facilities where the sick and injured could be efficiently treated. But the level of care in early hospitals could vary enormously, depending on their resources and quality of staff. Women from religious orders were known to provide some of the most effective and compassionate care. This example, the poor conditions, and the need for women to find employment led to the rapid increase in professional nurses by the end of the 19th century.

Modern Healthcare

By the 1930s hospitals were becoming a staple of society. Instead of relying on relatives for care, people in even smaller communities were able to turn to doctors and seek treatment at medical facilities. Professional nurses were on hand to perform a variety of functions. These included assisting physicians in their tasks, administrative duties, providing for patient needs, offering comfort, providing medication, and much more.  Technology increasingly has become an important part of the nursing role.

Changing Technology

Over this time and right up to the present, one of the major influences on healthcare and nursing came from technology. X-rays, new pharmaceuticals, and finally computers, DNA, and automation have become standard. Training in constantly-changing techniques and technology has become part of the nursing profession. Nurses today fulfill any number of critical positions and a variety of specialties. Part of this advancement nursing professionals are using and benefiting from agency management systems like Ankota to reduce paperwork, allowing them to focus on patient care and satisfaction.  In addition, agencies are seeking to have the nursing professionals more efficient and seek to move from assigning caseloads to more detailed schedules for service delivery while taking into account patient requirements, continuum of care and other agency and care priorities.

As it’s become a more exciting profession, the turnover in nurse staffing has dropped by 12 percent recently.

As people live longer lives, modern hospitals couldn’t function without a highly trained, technically savvy nursing staff. That makes it a more secure and respected career choice filled with opportunity. If you’re considering this career choice, it might not be a bad idea to look into mba programs. With all the advances in nursing, someone with a solid knowledge of business and technology would be sure to go far.

------

One of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies" available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

7_habits_effective_home_care.jpg

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Transitions, April 2017 Newsletter

Planning for Imperfection: 4 Ways Healthcare Agencies Should Protect Themselves

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 4, 2017 11:00:00 AM

No matter how careful you are as a healthcare organization, it seems that a legal claim is always at the back of your mind. While you cannot eliminate this possibility, you can take steps to help ensure that your exposure to risk is minimized. In the end, your primary objective is to help your patients. You should be free to do that without worrying about baseless legal claims made against you from patients, workers or family members. With that in mind, consider the following four ways that your organization can protect itself in the litigious environment in which we live.

Planning for Imperfection, 4 Ways Healthcare Practitioners Should Protect Themselves-s.jpeg

Make Sure You Adhere to the Standards of Care

No matter what type of practice you are in, there are rules and regulations in place for a reason. Work hard to follow a set protocol, no matter what type of situation you might encounter. To do otherwise is to encourage a lawsuit if something were to go awry. Make sure that you follow proper procedures, best practices, and adhere to the current standard of care.

Communicate across the Board

All healthcare facilities need to ensure proper communication among all personnel that interact with the patient. This is how patient information flows, and it is how mistakes are minimized. If you fail to communicate properly, patient care can suffer. To protect yourself, you want to ensure that you communicate all important patient information to other practitioners who are also involved in the treatment of individuals in your charge.  Be sure that you document as required and where needed.  This may involve forms at the point of care.  You will want the ability to deploy new forms quickly or modify them quick as the need arises as well as have patients sign them, for example.

Retain a Lawyer

In the event that a legal challenge does come up, you will want to have  legal representation that understand healthcare and is ready to defend and protect your rights. It is better to have this arranged ahead of time, Firms like Obradovich Law are a good option. The right attorney can help you safeguard your interests.  By reviewing where you are in advance could save you significant time and money in the long term.

Document Everything You Can

Your motto should become that if you didn’t write it down, then it didn’t happen. This will get you in the happen of documenting everything pertinent to the care of your patients.  Your agency management system can play a key role in reducing paperwork, while increasing your efficiency, all the while providing you with additional protection if a legal does arise.  Electronic Visit Verification, known as EVV, will soon be mandated for Medicaid and Medicare across the US.  This type of electronic time clock helps to reduce fraud, waste and abuse in the post-acute care market as well as documents when a worker is in the home or facility, a critical piece of independently documented data needed in determining and documenting where and when a worker was in the home if an issue where to arise.

If you will follow these four pieces of advice, you will be well-positioned to protect your organization. Remember that it is all about doing what is best for your patients.

------

One of Ankota's recent whitepapers, entitled "Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies" available for download and we think you'll find it useful.  Please click the link or the picture below to download.  If you're interested in scheduling an online demo of our home care or care transitions software solutions, just click this button:

Click Here for a Free Demo

7_habits_effective_home_care.jpg

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Transitions, April 2017 Newsletter

Subscribe to Email Updates

About Ankota

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Follow Ankota on Twitter!

twitter bird white on blue

Most Popular Posts

Posts by Month

New Module

Add content here.