The Ankota Healthcare Delivery Management Blog

Winter Weather Watch List - Caring for Your Senior This Winter

Posted by Ken Accardi on Mar 2, 2015 9:08:00 AM

We're taking a break from our typical topics of care transitions and home care and happy to bring back a guest blog from Chicago-based freelance blogger and writer Beth Kelly.  Beth's bio is below.

Caring for Your Senior This Winter

Winter can be a dangerous time of the year — particularly for senior citizens. However, caregivers can take some easy precautions to help elderly individuals remain comfortable and safe during this frigid time of the year.

Remove Ice

Falls are a common occurrence for older people, and the presence of ice can increase that risk. Ice poses a special threat to the elderly, who often lack the agility of younger people and may suffer from osteoporosis. You should carefully shovel driveways and walkways to clear out snow and use salt or another deicing agent to prevent ice buildup. If you personally are not able to do this, arrange for someone to do so regularly. In addition, all steps leading to the home should be in good repair and have sturdy railings installed.

Proper Attire

Bundle_Up_Ankota_home_care_blog

Because seniors have a slower metabolism, and slower circulation, they are more susceptible to becoming dangerously cold. It's important to cover the neck, hands, and other exposed areas of the body and to wear enough layers to retain body heat when outdoors. These clothes should be made out of warm material, such as wool or fleece, in order to stay as warm as possible. Dry boots and shoes with enough grip to maintain balance are essential. It's important for seniors to remove their wet footwear upon entering the house; otherwise, they may create slippery indoor conditions.

Tackle Seasonal Depression

The winter months seem to be filled with holiday cheer and quality time with family but many are negatively affected by the lack of sunlight. Those who have Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) feel down when they aren’t exposed to light during the winter. Because people tend to remain at home when the weather is cold, it can be difficult to stay in touch with friends and family. You should remember to visit or call your senior as frequently as possible to increase human contact. A simple “how are you doing?” can brighten their mood. You may also wish to consider establishing a schedule with neighbors to have someone check on the well-being of the senior every day.

Pay Attention to Warning Signs

Warning_signs_senior_care_Ankota_home_care_blog

It's critical for elders to know about the warning signs of hypothermia, frostbite, and heart attack. People suffering from hypothermia feel cold, have pale skin, and are often confused and disoriented. Discolored or hard skin and numbness could be signs of frostbite. Vigorous physical activity, such as shoveling snow, can cause heart attacks in the elderly. Dizziness, a constricted feeling in the chest, and shortness of breath are all indications of a heart attack. Anyone suffering from these symptoms should cease what they are doing and call for medical assistance immediately as it could be detrimental to their health, if not fatal.

Home Heating Issues

Heating equipment is vital for maintaining safe indoor temperatures, but there are certain risks associated with it. If an elderly person uses a space heater, it's important to keep it away from clothes or other items that may catch fire - one of the biggest causes of dangerous fires this time of year. Hospice care providers who work in home should also encourage their client’s families to look into home insurance coverage that accounts for these kinds of accidents, if — heaven forbid — an accident should occur (click here for info). You should also check all vents and filters every year to reduce the threat of carbon monoxide poisoning. Smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be regularly maintained and placed throughout the house in visible and easy-to-reach locations.

Prepare for Storms

Caregivers should help the elderly stock up on supplies in preparation for a storm. Make sure they have enough medication and food on hand to remain comfortable and healthy even if they cannot get to a grocery store or pharmacy for several days. In case of a power outage, it's useful to prepare emergency kits containing batteries, flashlights, a radio and other items that could prove indispensable. If possible, you should even plan to stay with your caretaker in case they need your immediate help.

Safeguard Health

healthy_living_Ankota_home_care_best_practices_blog

Proper nutrition is essential for maintaining health and avoiding hypothermia. Caffeine can lead to dehydration, so seniors are urged to reduce their caffeine intake during the winter. At the same time, it's important to drink juice, milk, water and other fluids to remain hydrated. Some elders are at risk of calcium, vitamin D or other deficiencies, in which case dietary supplements and vitamins may be needed. Eating healthy can also help beat winter blues for those affected by the lack of sunlight. For seniors who have trouble preparing and eating enough food, a service like Meals on Wheels may be able to help.

Seniors are at risk of certain winter hazards that don't pose much threat to younger people. But by informing themselves of common issues and taking the proper precautions, their loved ones can do much to keep them healthy and happy during this time of the year.

Author Bio

Beth Kelly is a freelance blogger and writer from Chicago, IL. She’s become passionate about healthcare and technology issues, and how the two can intersect to make life easier for senior citizens and others with limited mobility. In her free time she’s an avid gardener and lover of silent films. Find her on twitter @bkelly_88

For other home care best practices, please download the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies.  Just click the link to download our list of what we've found successful agencies tend to have as habits.

If you're interested in learning more about our home care management software solutions, or about our Care Transitions component as a way to increase revenue, just click the button below: 

Click Here for a Free Demo

13 Habits of Exceptionally Likeable People_Ankota Home Care Blog_Marketing and Sales

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

 

Topics: Senior Living, Elderly Care, Private Duty Agency Software

Proof That Non-Medical Home Care Aides Can Significantly Reduce Hospitalizations

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 25, 2015 12:33:00 PM

For the most part, Home Care Aides have not received significant formal health care training, but they are often the best care providers on the planet.  They're able to learn the skills needed to provide care and to deliver the care with expertise and compassion.  A recent study in western Pennsylvania has proven that aides, with a small amount of training, can play a key role in reducing hospital admissions. 

As shown in the graphic below, readmissions were reduced 60% and ER visits were reduced 43%. 

Home_Care_Navigators_reduce_hospital_admissions

Here are some of the key facts about the program as described in this article on the Accenture newsroom website:

“In initiating the pilot program, we recognized the opportunity to improve and assure timely access to quality healthcare for the communities we serve, while creating sustainable employment opportunities,” said Yvonne Cook, president of the Highmark Foundation. “We look forward to replicating the successes achieved in that study in other communities in the future.” 

  • The non-medical navigators were able to take on approximately 25% of the work that would have otherwise been assigned to a clinician
  • Navigator tasks included post-discharge follow-ups and scheduling primary care visits
  • Accenture estimates that the demand for patient navigators will nearly double in the next three years

Ankota_Home_Care_Best_Practices_Blog_Caregiver_Success

We're really excited to see these results because it proves that the model works.  We believe that non-medical home care agencies are ideally suited to fill this market need and are driving a major transformation in health care. 

For more information on this topic, please feel free to download our white paper, Why Care Transitions Is The Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry.  Just click the link to download the paper.

If you're interested in learning more about our home care management software solutions, or about our Care Transitions component as a way to increase revenue, just click the button below: 

Click Here for a Free Demo

Ankota Home Care_Marketing and Sales Best Practices

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Home Care, Avoidable Readmissions

Coming Home From the Hospital is Dangerous: Home Care Transitions is the Answer

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 23, 2015 1:20:00 PM

The Dangers of Coming Home From the Hospital

Hospital Readmissions Ankota Home Care BlogI read a great recent article on Forbes.com entitled "Coming Home From The Hospital Is Actually More Dangerous Than You Might Expect."  The great thing about the article is that it tells people what to do to increase their chances of avoiding a readmission.  Editorial note: we believe that the chances of avoiding a readmission are highly improved when experts from a home care agency (like yours) helps manage the transition, and that this will futureproof your agency.

 

But back to the Forbes article (that we encourage you to read in its entirety), the following recipe is prescribed:

1.)  Understand your medications and ensure you talk to your doctor or pharmacist about how to take them.

2.)  Make sure to schedule and go to follow-up appointments with your doctor.

3.)  Find out if your hospital offers home visits or makes follow-up calls.

Forbes_Ankota_homecare_Best Practices

4.)  Inquire about referrals to community services, such as free transportation to follow up appointments and Meals on Wheels, and take advantage of them.

5.)  Ensure anyone taking care of you is engaged in all conversations throughout your healthcare experience.

6.)  Clearly know your instructions when leaving the hospital, and if you are unsure, ask, ask, ask – and ask again.

Home Care agencies are in a great position to help folks navigate through all this.  To get you started, we have a new free white paper, called Why Care Transitions Is The Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry.  If you're interested in learning more about our home care management software solutions, or about our Care Transitions component as a way to increase revenue, just click the button below: 

Click Here for a Free Demo

Ankota Home Care_Marketing and Sales Best Practices

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Avoidable Readmissions

Home Care Software Geek Explains the Importance of Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 18, 2015 8:29:00 AM

 

Posts by Home Care Software Geek in this blog don't talk about Home Care Nursing Software, Private Duty Telephony, DME Delivery Software, Care Transitions or the other topics we focus on regularly at Ankota. Instead, these posts are intended to keep our readers up to date with technology trends that might be useful to your agencies, such as social media technologies, mobile devices, and what's happening with bigger companies like MicrosoftGoogle and Apple. 

People shop a lot differently than they used to, and as I'm sure you know, a great deal of shopping these days starts on the Internet (and mostly with Google).  Case in point, if you search for "Home Care Software Geek" on Google, you see two paid advertisements and then Ankota pops to the top of the list.  Not a lot of people are searching for a home care software geek, but the bottom line is that blog posts like this one gave me that ranking and have increased the "mojo" of our entire site.  This all falls into the realm of Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

"Being on the first page of a Google search is a big deal for your home care agency and greatly increases your chances of being found."


Hubspot_logo_Ankota_Home_Care_blogI really respect a super geek (unrelated to home care) by the name of Dharmesh Shah.  Dharmesh is the cofounder of a company called HubSpot, that helps companies market themselves better on the web.  He's a top expert in the field of Internet marketing.  Last week he offered a snarky post on a topic that the SEO gurus are debating.  You don't really need to understand what the debate is about to understand his snarky post, but in a nutshell, it's his response to an argument about where the slashes are in the way that web sites are laid out.

Here's his answer, in the form of a humorous flow chart:

Secret_to_SEO_Ankota_Home_care_software_geek

The Bottom Line is that Blogging is the key to SEO.

Here are a few other articles about blogging that you might find useful:

Blogging is an easy and important way to increase website traffic, leads, and customers.  So let's all get to it! 

For other home care best practices, please download the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies.  Just click the link to download our list of what we've found successful agencies tend to have as habits.

If you're interested in learning more about our home care management software solutions, or about our Care Transitions component as a way to increase revenue, just click the button below: 

Click Here for a Free Demo

13 Habits of Exceptionally Likeable People_Ankota Home Care Blog_Marketing and Sales

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact us.

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, seo

13 Habits for Improving Home Care Marketing and Sales Performance

Posted by Jed Hammel on Feb 16, 2015 8:33:00 PM

Dr. Travis Bradberry, co-author of the #1 bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0, wrote an interesting and insightful article called, 13 Habits of Exceptionally Likeable People that I encourage you to read in full (just click the above link).

Dr._Travis_Bradberry_Emotional_Intellifence_2.0_-_Ankota_Home_Care_Blog

The book has been touted by such luminaries as The Dalai Lama and Dr. Stephen R. Covey (author of Ankota-favorite, "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People"), so it has some notable fans.  I can't claim to be "notable", but I am a big fan of Dr. Bradberry's point of view expressed in the article.

Both in my work with marketing and sales, as well as being a person who seeks to build relationships with interesting and high-quality people in general, it's important to me to genuinely connect with folks.

Specific to sales and marketing, I've been lucky enough to believe wholeheartedly in the value of the products or services I've helped to market and sell.  But in order to find out how those products or services can best be of value to prospective customers, I need to first connect with them on a human level.  It requires spending time with them to understand what their needs are, to get a sense of both the positives and the frustrations of their work, and to "get" why they do what they do.  Sales and marketing is all about building genuine overall trust.

Emotional_Intelligence_2_._0_Ankota_Home_care_blog_Marketing_and_Sales

All that may seem obvious to some, but how to get to the point where you are able to do all those things tends to be more difficult a proposition.  The harder questions are:  How do you go about connecting with folks?  What are some actionable steps I can take?

I'm glad you asked!  A good first start would be to consider these 13 habits and to read the full article.  To get the ball rolling though, I've listed the 13 habits below:   

 

1.)  They Ask Questions

2.)  They Put Away Their Phones

3.)  They Are Genuine

4.)  They Don’t Pass Judgment

5.)  They Don’t Seek Attention

6.)  They Are Consistent

7.)  They Use Positive Body Language

8.)  They Leave a Strong First Impression

9.)  They Greet People by Name

10.)  They Smile

11.)  They Know When To Open Up

12.)  They Know Who To Touch (and They Touch Them)

13.)  They Balance Passion and Fun

What would be on your list?  Do you have any tips you'd like to offer folks for improving home care marketing and sales?  Please leave a comment and share with other readers. 

As I mentioned, we are a fan of Covey's "7 Habits of Highly Effective People" and borrowed his title for our paper, 7 Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies .  Just click the link to download our list of what we've found successful agencies tend to have as habits.

If you're interested in learning more about our home care management software solutions, or about our Care Transitions component as a way to increase revenue, just click the button below: 

Click Here for a Free Demo

13 Habits of Exceptionally Likeable People_Ankota Home Care Blog_Marketing and Sales

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Home Care

Taking Responsibility for Reductions in Hospital Readmissions: Be Careful!

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 12, 2015 1:15:00 PM

Elizabeth E. Hogue, Esq. has written an in-depth article, "Taking Responsibility for Reductions in Hospital Readmissions: Be Careful!" that we encourage you to read, reposted here:

Ankota home care software

Hospital administrators are increasingly focused on decreasing readmission as they continue to receive penalties in the form of reductions in reimbursement from the Medicare Program. Hospital staff appropriately seek assistance from post-acute providers in order to achieve reductions. There is no doubt that Medicare-certified home health agencies, HME suppliers, private duty home care agencies, hospices, skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), assisted living facilities (ALFs), outpatient therapists, etc. can assist hospitals to reduce readmissions. The post-acute industry generally welcomes the recognition that it has a crucial role to play in this regard.

BUT, BE CAREFUL! It appears that staff at some hospitals have only a superficial understanding of how reductions can be achieved. This is true, in part, because there is a general lack of evidence and data to show what activities contribute to reductions in readmissions. It remains unclear whether hospital discharge planning activities, for example, can have a substantial impact on reductions in readmissions.

There is a tendency on the part of hospitals, however, to put the entire responsibility for reductions on the shoulders of post-acute providers. This point of view may lead to some potentially harmful results, including failure to reduce readmissions. It may also support the argument that hospitals should be able to choose post-acute providers for patients since they suffer the financial consequences when patients are readmitted.

On the contrary, it seems likely that reductions in readmissions will be achieved only through partnerships between hospitals and post-acute providers of all kinds. The operative word is clearly "partnership." This point of view is supported by Conditions of Participation (CoPs) of the Medicare Program for hospitals that govern discharge planning. Specifically, discharge planners/case managers at hospitals are required to:

  • Screen all inpatients soon after admission to determine which ones are at risk of adverse health consequences post-discharge if they lack discharge planning. Screening must include consideration of the following factors:

o Patients' functional status and cognitive ability

o Type(s) of post-hospital care that patients require, such as:

  • Home Health, attendant care, and other community-based services
  • Hospice or palliative care
  • Respiratory therapy
  • Rehabilitation services (PT, OT, Speech, etc.)
  • End Stage Renal Dialysis services
  • Pharmaceuticals and related supplies
  • Nutritional consultation/supplemental diets
  • SNFs
  • ALFs
  • Medical equipment and related supplies
  • Home and physical environment modifications
  • Transportation services
  • Meal services
  • Household services, such as housekeeping, shopping, etc.

o Whether the type(s) of post-hospital care require(s) the services of health care professionals or facilities

o Availability of required post-hospital health care services to patients

o Availability and capability of family and/or friends to provide follow-up care in the home

  • Evaluate post-discharge needs of inpatients identified in the first stage, or of inpatients who request an evaluation, or whose physician requests one. Evaluations must include the ability of patients to self-care post-discharge. An evaluation of the ability to self-care requires hospitals to actively solicit information regarding this issue not only from patients or their representatives, but also from family, friends, and support persons.
  • Develop a discharge plan, if indicated by the evaluation or at the request of the patient's physician
  • Initiate implementation of the discharge plan prior to the discharge of inpatients. This requirement includes provision of inpatient education/training to patients for self-care, or to patients' families or other support persons who will provide care in patients' homes. It includes arrangements for: 

o Transfer to rehabilitation hospitals, long term care hospitals, or long term care facilities 

o Referrals to home health agencies or hospices

o Referrals for follow-up with physicians and therapists

o Referrals to pertinent community resources that may assist with financial, transportation, meal preparation or other post-discharge needs

Anecdotally, it appears that hospital discharge planners/case managers are not consistently engaging in these activities and others required by the CoPs. Compliance with the CoPs for discharge planning may have a significant impact on reductions in readmissions in partnership with post-acute providers of all types.

©2015 Elizabeth E. Hogue, Esq.  All rights reserved.  No portion of this material may be reproduced in any form without the advance written permission of the author.

If you'd like to learn more about Ankota's software for home care and care transitions, click here for a demo or click the following link to download our latest white paper,  "Why Care Transitions is the Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry."

Why_Care_Transitions_is_the_next_big_thing_for_the_Home_Care_industry

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

Topics: Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care, Care Transitions, Elizabeth E. Hogue Esq., hospital readmissions, griswold home care

5 Business Books Every Home Care Owner Should Read

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 9, 2015 3:43:00 PM

John_Hargrave_-_Media_ShowerI love it when I meet someone in an unexpected way and find that they do extraordinary things.  I met John Hargrave in church.  He and I both have some musical talents (he plays bass and I play trumpet) and we both have musically talented kids whom we are very proud of.  Another bond that we share is that we both got our MBA degrees at Babson College.  Folks often think of schools such as Harvard or Wharton when they think "Business School", but Babson is consistently ranked Number 1 in Entrepreneurship, and their program is geared towards starting and growing businesses. I learned a ton that I've applied to Ankota and have shared a lot of that information with readers of our blog.

Babson

Back to John, he's an unassuming guy at church, but in other venues, he's a notorious prankster.  A few of his credits include:

By the way, he asked Buckingham Palace to knight him, and they refused, so instead he legally changed his name to Sir John Hargrave.

Media_Shower_-_Ankota_Blog

Moving to the serious side of John, he's the CEO of Media Shower (www.mediashower.com), a company that helps others to do much better on search engines, and he's a strong business person.  He recently posted a blog with recommendations for 5 business books that are worth reading.  By the way, I love that he brings his sense of humor into his work.  The Media Shower Blog is called "Thoughts from the Shower."

The 5 Best Business Books They Don't Teach You in Business School

By means of full disclosure, I've only read two of the books that John is recommending below and that was a while back, but as an entrepreneur and business leader, I can vouch for those two and I'm sure that the others are great as well.  As a home care leader, it's always a good idea to get perspectives on leadership, and these books can be a great list to work through.

I'll give you the titles here and encourage you to read the full article on John's blog, where he gives you a synopsis, tells you what he likes about the books, and even shares how they were rated by GoodReads.

Here's the List:

If these books inspire you to examine how you're leading your home care business, allow us to attempt to do the same with our latest free white paper, "Why Care Transitions is the Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry." 

Why_Care_Transitions_is_the_next_big_thing_for_the_Home_Care_industry

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

Topics: Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care, Care Transitions, Mediashower.com

How to Choose a Reputable In-Home Caregiver via Griswold Home Care

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 4, 2015 11:53:00 AM

Griswold Home Care recently posted a piece called, Caregiver Ethics: How to Choose a Reputable In-Home Caregiver that they have graciously allowed us to share with you here.

Griswold_Home_Care

I suggest that you click the link to read the full article, but to start, here is a short summary of the article provided by Griswold as well:

In Griswold Home Care’s article Caregiver Ethics: How to Choose a Reputable In-Home Caregiver Sarah Peterman discusses the steps of how to select the right in-home caregiver for your loved ones. The important first step is to figure out what type of care your family member requires. Once you have an understanding of what is required you will need to write a job description detailing the level of care required.

home_care_AnkotaIn addition to understanding what care is required for your loved one and making this clear in the job description, you need to also have an understanding of the code of ethics your caregiver should be adhering to. A major component in the relationship between caregivers and their clients is that clients should be treated with respect. For example, caregivers should treat clients in a way where their cultural and religious beliefs are always respected.

 

To learn more about caregiver ethics you can refer to the full article.  And if you are seeking an in-home caregiver, check out Griswold Home Care’s home care locator

If you'd like to learn more about Ankota's software for home care and care transitions, click here for a demo or click the following link to download our latest white paper,  "Why Care Transitions is the Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry."

Why_Care_Transitions_is_the_next_big_thing_for_the_Home_Care_industry

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

Topics: Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Aging in Place Technology, Home Care, Care Transitions, griswold home care

What Does It Mean to be a Home Care Nurse or Aide?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Feb 2, 2015 10:33:00 AM

In the first home care industry event that I ever attended, I met two gentlemen named Tom Boyd and Tom Nicholas.  Their company, aptly named Boyd and Nicholas, was very focused.  They billed themselves as the "Cost Report Guys," and had built a practice around cost reporting for Home Health agencies.  But this isn't why they stood out initally to me. They stood out because they were in shorts, sandals, and Hawaiian shirts...and because the feature of their booth was a drawing for some pretty nice bottles of wine.

Since then, I've been on their email distribution list where they share industry news and perspective.  Every other Friday they send out their "Points of Light", which is usually a compilation of clever and uplifting tidbits.  Incidentally, they merged their company and became part of Simione Healthcare Consultants, and I think that Tom Nicholas retired.

Anyway, the title of a recent email of theirs was, "What Does Being a Nurse Mean", and in it they shared the anonymous poem below.  For me, it helped conjure up what the experience on the front lines of home care is about...I enjoyed it and thought that you would as well:

Being a Nurse Means:

Nurse_Ankota

You will never be bored
You will always be frustrated
You will be surrounded by the challenge of
So much to do and so little time

You will carry immense responsibility
You will step into people's lives
And you will make a difference

Some will bless you
Some will curse you

You will see people at their worst
And at their best

You will never cease to be amazed
At people's capacity for love, courage, and endurance

You will see life begin and end
You will experience resounding triumphs
And devastating failure

You will cry a lot
You will laugh a lot
You will know what it is to be human and to be humane 

-Author Unknown 

Simione_Ankota.com


You can learn more about Simione Healthcare Consultants at www.simione.com and sign up for their newsletter.

 

If you'd like to learn more about Ankota's software for home care and care transitions, click here for a demo or click the following link to download our latest white paper,  "Why Care Transitions is the Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry."

Why_Care_Transitions_is_the_next_big_thing_for_the_Home_Care_industry

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

Topics: Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Aging in Place Technology, home care software geek, Home Care, Care Transitions

Home Care Software Geek Shares Forbes Top 10 Tech Trends for 2015

Posted by Jed Hammel on Jan 28, 2015 10:12:00 AM

The Home Care Software Geek posts in this blog don't talk about Home Care Nursing Software, Private Duty Telephony, DME Delivery Software, Care Transitions or the other topics we focus on regularly at Ankota. Instead, these posts are intended to keep our readers up to date with technology trends that might be useful to your agencies, such as social media technologies, mobile devices, and what's happening with bigger companies like MicrosoftGoogle and Apple.

Forbes_Ankota_blog

Forbes posted (in pictures), a handy list of the top 10 technology trends for 2015. You can see their full post here, but I've share their list below to comment on what the trends may mean for home care:

  1. Computing Everywhere: Almost everyone has a smart phone these days, including home health aides.  You should be looking to take advantage of this.  For example, Ankota's telephony functionality now runs on smart phones.
  2. The Internet of Things (IoT): This is one of the new buzz-phrases and refers to putting web connectivity into more and more devices.  For home care, we can think of Internet connected inhalers, med dispensers, PERS devices and more.
  3. 3D Printing: This is a really cool technology and I know that my wife is using it for medical device prototyping, but candidly I can't think of an immediate use for 3D printing in home care.
  4. Advanced, Pervasive, Invisible Analytics: Reporting is getting faster, broader, more sophisticated, and includes "big data."  In health care, I expect that treatment will be determined in the future by population sampling and DNA.
  5. Context-Rich Systems:This refers to systems that will understand their surroundings and react to them.  Telehealth is an example.
  6. Smart-Machines: A great example of this is the NEST thermostat.  In home care, I would again look to teleheath and devices connected via blue tooth to smart phones.
  7. Cloud/Client Architecture: Software should run in the cloud and be accessible from computers,  mobile phones, and tablets.
  8. Software Defined Infrastructure and Applications: Nowadays, you can provision computers and storage with software.  If you stil have "servers" in your office, they should probably be on the cloud instead.
  9. Web-scale IT: There used to be individual software and enterprise software that could support a whole company.  But now, there are applications (like Google Applications and Facebook) that scale to millions of users on the web.  This redefines how software needs to be developed (e.g., to allow it to run on many parallel computers.
  10. Risk-Based Security and Self-Protection: As computer hacking becomes more sophisticated, so do the defense mechanisms used in home care software.

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Of all the great technology available today, I'd say that the most important for home care is the ability to collaborate with other care providers via software.

If you'd like to learn more about Ankota's software for home care and care transitions, click here for a demo or click the following link to download our latest white paper,  "Why Care Transitions is the Next Big Thing for the Home Care Industry."

Why_Care_Transitions_is_the_next_big_thing_for_the_Home_Care_industry

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

Topics: Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Care Coordination, Aging in Place Technology, home care software geek, Home Care, Care Transitions, forbes, tech trends 2015

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About Ankota

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

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