The Ankota Healthcare Delivery Management Blog

Happy Holidays from Ankota!

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 19, 2014 2:47:00 PM

Ankota_Team_Christmas_Photo

 

This holiday season, as we gather with loved ones, we are reminded that every day an individual is at home surrounded by the people and things that they love, their quality of life is better, and their health care costs are lower.  This time of year reinforces Ankota's top goal - To make the delivery of care more efficient and easier to coordinate.

The Ankota Team would like to wish you, our readers and clients, Happy & Healthy Holidays!  We hope you had a wonderful 2014 and we wish you the very best in 2015! 

happy_holidays

 

 

 

 

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Private Duty Home Care Blogs, Private Duty Agency Software, Care Transitions, happy holidays

Kaiser Shares That 2,610 Hospitals Will Be Penalized $428MM for Readmissions

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 17, 2014 12:53:00 PM

Kaiser Health News has graciously allowed us to republish their article disclosing CMS Readmision Penalties for 2015.  Without further adieu, here's the article: 

Medicare Fines 2,610 Hospitals In Third Round Of Readmission Penalties

By Jordan Rau, Kaiser Health News

 Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a nonprofit national health policy news service. 

Medicare is fining a record number of hospitals – 2,610 – for having too many patients return within a month for additional treatments, federal records released Wednesday show. Even though the nation’s readmission rate is dropping, Medicare’s average fines will be higher, with 39 hospitals receiving the largest penalty allowed, including the nation’s oldest hospital, Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia.

The federal government’s penalties, which begin their third year this month, are intended to jolt hospitals to pay attention to what happens to their patients after theyReadmission_Vicious_Circle leave. Around the country, many hospitals are replacing perfunctory discharge plans—such as giving patients paper instructions—with more active efforts, such as ensuring that outside doctors monitor their recoveries and giving supplies of medication to patients who may not be able to afford them. Others are still struggling to meet the new expectations. Before the program, some hospitals resisted such efforts because they weren’t paid for the services, and, in fact, benefited financially when a patient returned.

Last year, nearly 18 percent of Medicare patients who had been hospitalized were readmitted within a month. While that is lower than past years, roughly 2 million patients return a year, costing Medicare $26 billion. Officials estimate $17 billion of that comes from potentially avoidable readmissions.

Under the new fines, three-quarters of hospitals that are subject to the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program are being penalized. That means that from Oct. 1 through next Sept. 30, they will receive lower payments for every Medicare patient stay —  not just for those patients who are readmitted. Over the course of the year, the fines will total about $428 million, Medicare estimates.

More than 1,400 hospitals are exempted from the penalties, including certain cancer hospitals and critical access hospitals, as well as facilities dedicated to specific services such as psychiatry or rehabilitation. Maryland hospitals are also excluded because the state has a unique payment arrangement with Medicare. The fines are based on readmissions from July 2010 through June 2013.

In New Jersey, every hospital but one will lose money this year. So will a majority of hospitals in 28 other states, including California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Texas, as well as the District of Columbia, according to a Kaiser Health News analysis of the penalties.

Pay_fines

While some penalties are as small as a hundredth of a percent, hospitals with the highest readmission rates are losing 3 percent of each payment, an increase from a maximum punishment of 2 percent last year. The increase brings the top penalties to the full force authorized by the federal health law.

The 39 hospitals where payments will be lowered by 3 percent include a number of specialty surgical hospitals, small community hospitals and the Pennsylvania Hospital, a major teaching facility. The hospital, founded in 1751 by Benjamin Franklin and Dr. Thomas Bond, is part of Penn Medicine. Hospital officials did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Another 496 hospitals will lose 1 percent or more of their Medicare payments. Those include Northwestern Memorial Hospital and Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan, Tufts Medical Center in Boston, and a few satellite hospitals owned by well-respected systems, including the Mayo Clinic and Geisinger Health System.

Medicare levied penalties against 433 more hospitals than it did last year. The average penalty this year is 0.63 percent, up from 0.38 percent last year, according to the KHN analysis.

Two More Conditions Added

One reason for the higher and more widespread fines is that this year Medicare began evaluating readmissions of two new categories of patients—those initially admitted for elective knee or hip replacements, and those suffering lung ailments such as chronic bronchitis. Those patients were assessed along with the heart failure, heart attack and pneumonia patients Medicare has examined since the penalties began in October, 2012

Heart

A hospital was fined if it had higher than expected readmission rates in any category. Thus, a number of specialty hospitals that focus on hip and knee replacements received fines for theq first time because readmissions of those patients are now being assessed, the KHN analysis found. Fines increased for each condition where rates were above Medicare’s expectations. “Every time they add conditions, the penalties go up,” said Nancy Foster, a quality expert at the American Hospital Association.

Dr. Stephen Jencks, a consultant who was one of the first researchers to document the nation’s high readmission rates, said he was impressed overall by how much the fines have prompted hospitals to concentrate on their patients’ health after discharge. “This really fairly modest step” of penalties has “persuaded a lot of hospitals to talk in ways they simply were not talking 10 years ago,” he said.

Dr. Don Goldmann, chief medical and science officer at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, a Massachusetts nonprofit, cautioned against attributing the drop in readmissions only to the penalties, since the government also has other, less punitive programs underway. “There’s so much at play,” Goldmann said. “I’d be careful about imputing the reduction to any one intervention.”

As the penalties have played out, an increasing number of prominent experts are voicing concerns that the punishments are too harsh and doled out unfairly. For one thing, Readmission_Arm_BandsMedicare lowers payments to hospitals even if they have reduced their readmission rates from the previous year—so long as their rate is still higher than what the government believes is appropriate for that hospital. Medicare uses the national readmission rate to help decide what appropriate rates for each hospital, so to reduce their fines from previous years or avoid them altogether, hospitals must not only reduce their readmission rates but do so better than the industry did overall.

“You have to run as fast as everyone else to just stay even,” Foster said. Only 129 hospitals that were fined last year avoided a fine in this new round, the KHN analysis found.

Medicare officials, however, consider the competition good motivation for hospitals to keep on tackling readmissions and not to become complacent with their improvements.

Another concern about the program is that safety-net hospitals that treat large numbers of low-income patients have been more likely to receive penalties, in part because poor patients face financial and logistical challenges that make them more likely to get sicker after discharge than others, even if the hospital is trying to oversee their recuperations.

Much of the formula that calculates the fines was written into the health law, and Medicare has maintained it cannot unilaterally change it. The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, which makes recommendations to Congress, has urged that the government compare hospitals to similar ones—academic medical centers to each other, for instance—when assessing penalties.

bill

Experts convened by the National Quality Forum, a nonprofit that evaluates measures the government uses, also endorsed the idea of taking socio-economic status into account in creating many different health care metrics. The forum said it will test the approach. Meanwhile, bills are pending in both houses of Congress that would make Medicare consider socio-economic status of a hospital’s patients when calculating fines.

The Obama administration has raised concerns that assuming safety-net hospitals will do poorer in avoiding readmissions might encourage lower expectations for the quality of care for low-income patients. Some experts fear that hospitals with many readmissions are providing substandard care and should not be let off the hook.

“Low [socio-economic status] patients do often—but not always—have worse outcomes, and yet we know they are often exposed to lower quality of care, whether that’s the places that they go or the access to care that have,” said Dr. Susannah May Bernheim, director of quality measurement at the Yale School of Medicine’s Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, which created the method Medicare uses to count readmissions. However, she said, “it is important to understand that safety net providers both may be more vulnerable to payment penalties and may in fact need more than average resources to achieve good outcomes for their patients.”

‘It’s A Quagmire’

study published this month in The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety examined eight safety-net hospitals to see how they were handling readmissions. The researchers found that most of the hospitals’ leaders were concerned about the penalties, with one telling interviewers that they expected “the penalty will get bigger and bigger and then other payers [such as private insurance companies] are going to pick up on it.”

The program was popular among nurses and doctors, with one saying “we understand, we know the importance of it,” that “in order to get a response from administration, you have to penalize.”

The researchers, led by Dr. Karen Joynt and other current and former academics at Harvard’s school of public health and the medical school, discovered that one of the eight hospitals was not trying to cut readmissions because its financial stability would be undermined by fewer patients.  “It’s a quagmire,” an anonymous hospital official was quoted in the study as saying. “If you affect the population correctly, you will reduce both readmissions and overall admissions, which is good for the patient but financially bad for the hospital.”

Gina Kaurich, director of client-care services at the Cincinnati-based FirstLight HomeCare, one of many companies offering to help hospitals prevent readmissions, said she has seen hospitals take various approaches in light of the penalties. Some have tried to care for returning patients without readmitting them overnight so Medicare does not count their cases, she said. Others have assigned their own nurses to visit patients at home shortly after discharge to ensure the patients are properly taking care of themselves. Still others hire private companies like hers, which sends nurse assistants to homes.

“Before the penalties and the focus, I believe the hospitals were quite well aware of this, and a readmission almost was something that was expected,” Kaurich said. “It was [considered] part of the disease process.”

jrau@kff.org

Read more about this story’s methodology, view the average impact on each state, and download hospital data as a printable PDF or CSV spreadsheet.

This article was produced by Kaiser Health News with support from The SCAN Foundation. 

Increasing_Profitability_via_Care_Transitions

If you're interested in learning more about how your agency can benefit from a Care Transitions initiative, you can download our free White Paper, Increasing Profitability via CareTransitions. 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Care Coordination Payments, Care Coordination, transitional care, Care Transitions, kaiser, medicare, readmission penalties

Many Seniors Report Disabilities: What Can We Learn From This?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 15, 2014 10:30:00 AM

This short news article in HealthDay gives us the insight that 40 percent of seniors have reported a disability.  The study behind the article focuses on disabilities including hearing, sight, thinking and memory, walking, self-care and independent living.  It draws from data via the census bureau.

Ted_talk

Reading this article has made me think about a few different things:

  • There's an organization called TED (www.ted.org) whose mission is to share good ideas around the world.  The cornerstone of their content is in the form of TED Talks, which are 15 minute lectures by experts on topics where they have expertise.  One such TED talk, given by British researcher Aubrey de Grey, outlines a plan to overcome aging.  Putting aside whether or not it's a good idea, it's certainly interesting.  You can watch it here.
  • The second thought that this conjures is a discussion with the person who sold Long Term Care Insurance to me and my wife. We arranged for coverage for both of us but that transfers to the surviving spouse after one passes away.  One piece of advice that she gave was to start using your benefits when you're eligible (when you need help with at least two activities of daily living (ADLs).  In her experience, people are inclined to save their benefits for later, but indicated that once an individual needs help with two or more ADLs, that life expectancy is generally 4 years or less, so she encourages us to use them when the time comes.
  • Last is the most simple and possibly the most compelling thought.  There's a quote on a poster in my gym with a quote attributed to Dr. Kenneth Cooper that says "We do not stop exercising because we grow old - we grow old because we stop exercising."  That's pretty compelling.

Exercise

So far, no human has figured out how to live forever, but there is compelling evidence that part of the aging process and associated disabilities comes from lack of exercise.  This could be exercising the body or exercising the mind.  So the take away for home care is to encourage your care givers to help their clients exercise their body and mind.  Take them for a walk and play some Scrabble.  It will likely pass the time faster and more enjoyably and you may just be increasing their life.

If you're interested in recieving our 7 Habits of Highly Effective Private Duty Home Care Agencies, just click the link.  If you're interested in learning more about how your agency can benefit from a Care Transitions initiative, you can download our free White Paper, Increasing Profitability via CareTransitions. 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Increasing_Profitability_via_Care_Transitions

 

Topics: Home Care Blog, Care Coordination, Care Transitions, HealthDay, Long term care insurance, TED talk

Walgreens Positioning to Be a Major Health Care Information Hub

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 8, 2014 5:05:00 PM

A few months ago, we shared that Walgreens pharmacy had entered the Care Transitions business with a program to help avoid readmissions.  You can read the article here.  In a nutshell, they saw some opportunities in the Care Transition space.

walgreens-resized6

To start, Walgreen's understands that a couple of the key reasons patients are readmitted is that they don't fill their meds or they have the wrong meds.  Guess what?  Walgreens can provide the meds that they need and make some money at it (note that the program doesn't require that the patient get their meds from Walgreens).  

It also seems that Walgreens pictures the future of health care and knows the critical role that they can play in helping avoid hospitalizations.  I admire their vision and their resolve, and remain optimistic that the home care industry will borrow from their playbook.

Future_Sign_ExitCare Transitions is only the beginning for Walgreens.  According to this article in Forbes,  They recognize that healthcare is undergoing a transformation that will include new players and new ways of doing business.  They are determined to being one of those key players and they are putting technology at the core of their strategy.

"Walgreens is looking to improve its whole operating model from end to end" - Walgreens CIO Tim Theriault

Among the elements in Walgreens' strategy are the following items:

  • A cloud-based Electronic Medical Record
  • Mobile-enabled retail outlets and clinics
  • Managing immunizations and secure immunization records for Veterans
  • Expanded customer rewards programs
  • Prescription updates on cell phones
  • Use of Big Data analytics in determining consumer behavior

What Can Home Care Learn from Walgrens?

Unlike Walgreens, the home care industry isn't one company, so movement in the industry needs to come from individual agencies.  Some recommended actions for your agency are as follows:

  • Look for new roles for your agency to play in the future of healthcare.  My recommendation is to look for opportunities in managing care transitions and ongoing chronic care.
  • Think beyond the traditional boundaries of your agency and look for opportunities to collaborate and coordinate care with others (perhaps Walgreens)
  • Take a hard look at your technology and whether it will take you to where you need to go.  Specifically, can your systems share patient information, scheduling and notes with others?

It's an exciting future and the visionary leaders among you will play a key role in it.

If you're interested in learning more about how your agency can benefit from a Care Transitions initiative, you can download our free White Paper, Increasing Profitability via CareTransitions.

Increasing Profitability via Care Transitions

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care.

To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.  

 

Topics: Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Care Coordination, Home Care, Care Transitions, Walgreens, Future of Health Care

Home Care Social Media Really Matters - Here are the Numbers

Posted by Ken Accardi on Dec 3, 2014 10:55:00 PM

How important do you consider Social Media to be in the success of your home care agency?  If your answer is something along the lines of "not so much", consider taking this opportunity to rethink it a bit.

MOZ_info_graphic

MOZ is a company that helps other companies succeed on the web and they have a useful page called, The Beginner's Guide To Social Media. 

I feel it's worthwhile for any businessperson to review.  Among the gems on the page is an infographic (shown to the left) that shares some key statistics on the subject.  

I suggest clicking through the MOZ page to view the source of each statistic.

If you're interested in finding more ways to improve your home care agency, you can download our free white paper, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private-Duty Home Care Agencies.  It offers folks a look at some Best Practices of what we've found successful private duty home care agencies possess. 


7_habits_effective_home_care-4

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care.

To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.  

 

Topics: Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Home Care, social media

5 Steps to Recruiting Quality Home Health Aides from Ginny Kenyon

Posted by Ken Accardi on Nov 25, 2014 9:25:00 AM

Ginny KenyonGinny Kenyon of Kenyon HomeCare Consulting, wrote an insightful article called, How to Recruit Home Health Aides for Your Home Care Agency in her "Kenyon Connects" blog that you should give a read.

She offers 5 steps for home care agencies to take toward hiring quality home health aides, which we've listed here.  Ginny's full article goes into detail about how to implement these steps, so be sure to click on the link above.

Have a Clear Profile for Potential Hires

Attract as Many Applicants For More Hiring Options

Designate One Person

twitter-recruitment-tool

Test Your Applicants

Management Must Be Involved

On a related note, our free white paper, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private-Duty Home Care Agencies offers folks a look at some Best Practices of what we've found successful private duty home care agencies possess. 

7_habits_effective_home_care-4

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care.

To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.  

 

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Home Care, Ginny Kenyon, Kenyon HomeCare Consulting

6 Tips for Success in Home Care From Stephen Tweed

Posted by Ken Accardi on Nov 20, 2014 4:12:00 PM

Stephen_Tweed-2015Stephen Tweed, of Leading Home Care, wrote a post entitled, Lessons from the Private Duty Field Trip, that outlines 6 key takeaways gleaned from extensive conversations with over 100 successful private duty agencies across the nation.  

I highly suggest that you read the full article and watch the video there, but as a start, here are 6 elements that Stephen's research determined are some key ways to grow a private duty home care agency:

Have a Huge Vision

Be a Systems Thinker

Try Lots of New Things

There is a Season for Everything

Field_Trip

Hire a COO

Measure Everything

Take a look at the full article and let us know if you would add a 7th point to that list.

On a related note, our free white paper, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private-Duty Home Care Agencies offers folks a look at some Best Practices of what we've found successful private duty home care agencies possess. 

7_habits_effective_home_care-4

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care.

To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.  

 

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Home Care Blog, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices, Home Care, Leading Home Care, Stephen Tweed

7 Home Care Entrepreneur Beliefs That Can Make You Unhappy

Posted by Ken Accardi on Nov 17, 2014 1:59:32 PM

Pharrell_Williams_-_Happy

I generally try to post in this blog about things that will make folks happy.  Whether it be how to make your home care agency more successful or how a home care entrepreneur can pursue opportunites, I tend to take the "glass half full" perspective on life.  That said, it can be important to take a look at some of the challenges and stumbling blocks that we may encounter, in order to better reach our goals.  

Jeff_Haden

I read an interesting post by Jeff Haden, who writes and speaks about business matters for Inc. Magazine, LinkedIn, and other publications.  His article, 7 Poisonous Beliefs That Make You Desperately Unhappy, caught my attention.  I highly recommend that you read his full article, especially if you identify with any of these beliefs, but for now, please allow me to share the list:

  • You believe professional success will bring lasting fulfillment
  • You believe that simply joining will create a sense of belonging
  • You believe you can do everything
  • You're afraid of who you really are
  • You have no one to call at 3 AM
  • You believe structure is the same as control
  • You believe you no longer need to fail

I hope that none of the above resonate with you, but if they do, please read Jeff's article.  He ends by putting things in perspective by sharing "If you realize you aren't so different or 'special' afterall, it's a lot easier to be happy with the people around you -- and happy with yourself."

Another list of 7 things that we'd like to share is Ankota's 7 Habits of Highly Successful Private Duty Home Care Agencies.

7_habits_effective_home_care-4

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Readmission Avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care.

To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.  

Topics: Home Care Best Practices, Home Care, Care Transitions, home care marketing, Jeff Haden

Home Care Software Geek Explains Agile Software Development

Posted by Ken Accardi on Nov 12, 2014 1:05:00 PM

Posts by Home Care Software Geek in this blog don't talk about Home Care Nursing Software, Private Duty Telephony, DME Delivery Software, Care Transitions or the other topics we focus on regularly at Ankota. Instead, these posts are intended to keep our readers up to date with technology trends that might be useful to your agencies, such as social media technologies, mobile devices, and what's happening with bigger companies like MicrosoftGoogle and Apple. 

This is a pretty geeky post, even for our home care software geek column.  It talks about how software is built and how that has changed over time.  During my career, there's been a fairly radical change in the way that software is developed.  This affects the way that the software is structured into small reusable pieces, and also the way that projects are structured. 

agile

The relevance of this to the home care and care transitions business is that it can help to explain why some software companies do major releases, such as once a year, and take you through a big and painful upgrade process.  While other software companies, like Ankota, are able to make changes quickly and deploy them pretty quickly (most enhancements requested by our customers are released in our next two week cycle).

We'll do another post to talk about the way software needs to be designed, but for now, we'll talk about how projects can be structured for efficient deployment...The new way is called "Agile Development," but first we'll explain the old way, which is generally called the "waterfall" method. 

The Old Way: Waterfall Software Development

We used to structure development like a waterfall, as depicted below.  A project would be defined with a big list of requirements, then there would be a project phase to design the changes, and this would often involve restructuring the underlying data structures for the system. 

waterfall

Then there would be a development phase where all of the changes would be developed, generally in parallel.  After that, there would be a testing phase where each piece would be tested individually, and then combined to see if they work together.  Continuing on, there would be regression testing to make sure that the old functionality wasn't broken.  The next step would be to set up a test environment and the users would be told about the changes and would retrain and test them.  Finally, there would be a "Go Live" event, usually planned overnight or on a weekend. 

The success with this methodology is dependent on having strong planning and strong project management.  There is a training and certification program called "Project Management Professional" (PMP) that teaches from a very large book called the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK) and includes many levels of planning, risk mitigation, and other techniques.  Planning like this has historically enabled very large projects to succeed (like sending people to the moon, for example).

The New Way: Agile Development

Most software development follows a new methodology called Agile Development.  This methodology is based on some very practical thinking, such as the following:

  • We might not really know today what we want the software to look like a year from now.  We might change our mind along the way.
  • Even if I think I know what I want, my best attempts to describe it might fall short and I'll know better if I got what I wanted when I see it.
  • If I make small changes and demonstrate them or even deploy them when they're done, if I screw up, I'll only have a small effort to adjust the change or take it out and rework it.
  • Related to the previous point, I'm best off if I always have working software, so every time I make a change I expect all of the software to still work.
  • If I can define a series of bite sized changes added to the software in a logical sequence, I'll be able to validate with customers that I'm moving in the right direction along the way.

Based on these highly practical thoughts, the agile methodology works as follows: 

The requests are broken into small pieces defined from the vantage point of the user.  These are put into a backlog (a list) and prioritized.  The team takes the highest priority things on the list that they think they can deliver (developed and tested) in a short period of time, perhaps two weeks.  The team makes a plan for those two weeks and may add or subtract from the list if needed to get the work done. 

Agile

Everyday when changes are made, the changes have to be well-contained and put into the software and tested to make sure that they worked and didn't break anything else.  If it's a new feature, it should be made "configurable" so that customers who don't want it, don't see it.  After the two weeks, everything is retested and some "smoke testing" is done to make sure that nothing was broken.  Then the software is deployed.

In our experience, agile works really well and our customers love getting changes quickly and never need to do any extensive testing or upgrades.

If you're tired of the old way, maybe it's time for some new software.  We'd love to show you our home care software, care transitions software, or other solutions.  If you love most of what we offer but would like some changes, give us 2-4 weeks, and perhaps we can meet your needs.

You can also download our free informational content, including our white paper, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private-Duty Home Care Agencies

7_habits_effective_home_care-4

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care.

To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.  

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, home care software geek, Home Care, agile development

3 Statistics Showing Growth in the Home Care Industry

Posted by Ken Accardi on Nov 6, 2014 6:43:00 PM

A recent article from Home Health Care News, entitled, Aging In Place Services More Important Now Than Ever, (drawing data from a larger detailed report,) offered three statistics that should be of note to folks seeking to start or to grow a home care agency:

By 2030, more than 70 million Americans will be age 65 and older. 

Nearly 90% of adults in this age group want to age in place. 

Over 70% of Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) provide what’s known as “diversion programs” to keep people living in their homes longer. Home-Health-Care-News-JPG-Filesmallnew

For some of you these stats may already be well known, while for others, they may be new to you.  In either case, a question probably occured to you, along the lines of: "Great info, what are some next steps?"  

Here are three steps folks can take to learn more about the home care industry and to stay current with trends and Best Practices.

1.) Read our previous article: Entrepreneurs: Starting a Non Medical Home Care Business to learn more about resources and industry associations in the space.

2.)  Subscribe via email to recieve regular blog posts from Ankota.  Simply enter your email address into the form to the top right of this page.

3.)  Download our free white paper, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Private-Duty Home Care Agencies

Next_Step

If you do find that you are in need of software to help manage your home care business, we hope that you explore what Ankota has to offer!

7_habits_effective_home_care-4

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care.

To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.  

 

Topics: Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care, home care marketing

Subscribe to Email Updates

About Ankota

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Follow Ankota on Twitter!

twitter bird white on blue

New Module

Add content here.

New Module

Add content here.