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Ankota: Ushering in the Next Generation of Homecare Blog

Community Demographics are a Key Indicator of Care Transition Success

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 29, 2014 9:30:00 AM

Ankota recently hosted Dr. Marc Greenwald on our monthly webinar on Care Transitions Best Practices.  Dr. Greenwald shared his experiences from running successful care transitions programs in several Massachusetts hospitals.  It was a well-attended and very informative webinar.  If you if missed our live broadcast, you can watch the recording here.

One of Dr. Greenwald’s key observations from working in urban and rural hospitals, and in different socioeconomic situations, was that these community factors are a key indicator of care transition success.  Well, he was right.  A recent study in Health Services Research and described in an article entitled Community Demographics Linked to Hospital Readmissions on the Center for Advancing Health website (www.cfah.org)* confirms Dr. Greenwald’s observations.

The article summarizes the following two takeaway points from the study:

  • Nearly 60 percent of the variation in hospital readmission rates appears to be associated with a hospital’s geographic location.
  • Counties with more general practitioners and nursing homes had lower rates of hospital readmissions.

Data from the Committee for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) was collected for 4,073 hospitals in 2,254 counties and covered the period from July 2007 to June 2010.  Key conclusions were as follows:

  • 58 percent of the variation in 30-day readmission rates was at the county level, before any information about the type of hospital or county was taken into account
  • This leads to the conclusion that individual hospital performance may account for only 42 percent of the variation in readmission rates

The lead author on the study, Jeph Herrin, Ph.D., senior statistician with Health Research and Educational Trust, shared that “the biggest surprise was how much affect the county or the community had on readmission rates.”  He also shared that "Hospitals in the same area had similar readmission rates as others in the area” showing that community has a bigger impact than specific hospital.  This is consistent with a recent NPR story on high readmission rates at Beth Israel Deaconess hospital in Boston (see more about this story here).

As the US health system moves to the “Accountable Care” model, there will continue to be more and more need for care coordination between providers, and in our editorial opinion, a greater need for collaboration between hospitals and home care.  Home care is uniquely positioned to bring nursing and health aide skills to the patient’s home and as the model matures, more reliance on home care to prevent individuals from becoming patients.

Ankota offers software to help manage care transitions from hospital to home and to avoid 30-day readmissions.  We’ve designed the software for organizations like home health agencies to accept referrals from multiple hospitals in their geographic community.  As it relates to the story above, having consistently strong care transitions capability for a community, independent of referring hospital, appears to have the potential for positive outcomes.  To learn more about the care transitions opportunity, go to www.ankota.com/care-transitions.  If you’d like a demo of the software, press the button below.

 Click to Learn how to Increase Profit via Care Transitions

*Note: The article draws copyrighted information from Health
Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health.
 

white paper describing care transition readmission avoidance opportunity     home care best practices

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Will Fingerprinting be a Deterrent Against Home Health Fraud?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 24, 2014 9:03:00 PM

Elizabeth Hogue is an attorney who specializes in the home health industry. Her email articles alwaus present a well-written, no-nonsence representation of the facts.  She also holds seminars on how to get referrals legally (and in these seminars she provides advice to providersHome Care Lawyer who aren't being referred by their local hospitals.)

Her most recent piece, shown in its entirety below, describes how the government is requiring Home Care Owners to have fingerprints on file.  

 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued MLN Matters Number SE1417 on April 11, 2014.  This Special Edition MLN Matters is intended for providers and suppliers who submit claims to Durable Medical Equipment (DME) Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) and Home Health and Hospice MACs for services provided to Medicare beneficiaries.  CMS makes it clear in this article that it will begin fingerprinting all owners of these types of providers with a 5% or greater ownership interest.  The ultimate goal is to fingerprint all owners with a 5% or greater ownership interest in all providers or suppliers in the high risk category that receive reimbursements from the Medicare Program. According to CMS, the implementation of fingerprint-based background checks as part of enhanced enrollment screening of providers is based on Section 640 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

 

When fully implemented, the fingerprint-based background check will be required for all individuals with a 5% or greater ownership interest in a provider or supplier that falls under the high risk category.  The high level of risk category appliesfingerprinting home care owners to all providers and suppliers who are newly enrolling DME suppliers or home health agencies.  This category will also apply to providers and suppliers who are elevated to the high risk category in accordance with enrollment screening regulations.

 

Fingerprint-based background checks will be implemented beginning in 2014.  Providers and suppliers subject to fingerprinting will receive notification of the requirements from their MAC.  The MACs will send notification letters to providers and suppliers that include a list of all owners with a 5% or greater ownership interest who are required to be fingerprinted.  Letters will be mailed to providers' or suppliers' correspondence addresses and special payments addresses on file with Medicare.  Individual fingerprinting will normally be required only once, but CMS reserves the right to request additional fingerprints, if needed. Owners will have thirty days from the date of notification letters to be fingerprinted.  Providers and suppliers that find discrepancies in the list of owners sent to them by the MACs should communicate the discrepancies and take appropriate action to update enrollment records to reflect corrected ownership information.

 

Notification letters will include contact information for the Fingerprint-Based Background Check Contractor (FBBC).  Individuals required to be fingerprinted are required to contact the FBBC prior to being fingerprinted to ensure that fingerprints are accurately submitted to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and that the results are properly transmitted to CMS.  Providers and suppliers subject to fingerprinting will be able to contact the FBBC by telephone or by accessing the FBBC's website.  Contact information for the FBBC will be included in notification letters sent by the MACs.  The FBBC will provide at least three locations convenient to individuals' locations where they can be fingerprinted.  One of the locations must be a local, state, or federal law enforcement facility.

 

Individuals required to be fingerprinted must bear all expenses related to being fingerprinted.

Home Care Best Practices 

CMS encourages providers and suppliers to provide fingerprints electronically, but CMS will accept the FD-258 card instead.  FD-258 cards submitted will be converted to electronic submissions to the FBI by the FBBC. 

 

Fingerprints will be sent to the FBI for processing.  The FBI will compile background history based on fingerprints within twenty-four hours of receipt and will share the results with the FBBC.  The FBBC will review each record and make recommendations to CMS regarding fitness.  CMS will assess recommendations from FBBC and make final determinations.  CMS may deny enrollment applications or revoke existing Medicare billing privileges based on its final determinations of the results of fingerprint background checks.

 

Providers and suppliers regularly face a number of hurdles in the enrollment process.  The above addition to the process is bound to increase providers' frustration.  Meticulous compliance will be the name of the game! 
©2014 Elizabeth E. Hogue, Esq.  All rights reserved.

What Does this Mean for Home Health, Hospice, and DME Providers?

From my perspective, this sends two messages.  One is that CMS is being very serious about the identities of the busines owners that it deals with in post acute care.  The second takeaway for me, since fingerprinting is generally associated with criminal activity, is that they're sending a warning to agencies considering fraudulent actions.  All of the home care agencies I've dealt with have been fully-reputable and lawful in their practices, so I personally applaud all efforts to weed out the bad apples.

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 

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Topics: Home Care Industry, Home Care Best Practices, Managing Post Acute Care

Putting the Wind Back Into Your Home Care Sales

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 21, 2014 9:13:00 PM

I'll have to see if the "bad pun" title works or not, but this is a serious topic.

What should you do if your Home Care Sales have Stalled?

Every business has its ups and downs, but if your agency has been in a slump for more than a few months, you need to take action.   I've found two great articles from Ginny Kenyon to help get you back on track.  The first one, published just this weekhome care growth and entitled How to Accelerate the Growth of Your Stalled Home Care Agency, offers the following suggestions:

  • Create a Strategic Plan
  • Get Organized
  • Hire the Right People
  • Modify your Marketing Plan
  • Update Policies and Procedures
  • Get Support
Changing you Marketing Plan can bring Fast Results
 
Drilling into the marketing plan, I had this issue when I acquired the assets of Ankota.  The former marketing team's plan was to focus primarily on trade shows to meet prospective customers and was not willing to do any prospecting.  Sales had totally stalled and the trade shows were months away and expensive.  We've since totally changed our marketing approach to mostly focus on the internet. We want people to find us when search for home care software and care transitions software.  Then we try to provide interesting and valuable content like our video describing the care transitions market opportunity and our paper The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Home Care Agencies.  After just a few months, we now have more than 5 times as many sales leads as we did previously.
 
I realize that our marketing challenge selling home care software is different than your challenge running a home care agency, but I'm 100% sure you can see better results if you focus on marketing and change your plan.  This recent article Home Care Marketing: Make Your Phone Ring can help!

Getting Support to Help Turn Your Agency Around

Reaching into another great Ginny Kenyon article entitled Is Your Home Care Revenue Stuck in Neutral provides this helpful list that a Home Care Consultant can help you with:

  • Conduct a thorough assessment of your business processes and management systems to improve productivityHome Care Best Practices White Paper 
  • Perform a market analysis to better understand your customers, competitors, and economic conditions 
  • Clarify short- and long-term goals and create action plans to stimulate growth 
  • Train employees and provide executive support 
  • Help reduce the coding errors that impact cash flow 
  • Create and implement innovative marketing strategies to increase customers 
  • Restructure your home care agency to be leaner and more efficient 
  • Develop strategic partnerships so you can expand into new markets

We wish you the best in getting your home care agency back on track!

Can we answer home care software questions?

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Private Duty Agency Software, Home Care Best Practices

Pharmacist-Led Care Transitions: Good or Bad for Home Health?

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 15, 2014 8:39:00 AM

Walgreens Pharmacy has instituted a pharmacist-led care transitions program called WellTransitions® and they are posting impressive results.  According to a Business Wire Press Release on April 4th, 2014, participants in the WellTransitions® program were 46 percent less likely to have an unplanned 30 day readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge.

Walgreens Care Transitions resized 600

All care transitions programs, such as the Eric Coleman Care Transitions Intervention® and the NTOCC Seven Essential Care Transitions Elements, focus on medication management as a key focus area for reducing readmissions.  However, there are other elements as well, including: Ensuring that the patient has a follow-up appointment with theirCare Transitions Whiteboard primary care physician.  Ensuring that the patient goes to the appointment well-equipped with their personal health record and with knowledge of how to manage the “red flags” related to their conditions.  The Business Wire release describes the following about the WellTransitions® program:

WellTransitions helps reduce preventable hospital readmissions by supporting patients throughout the care continuum. Walgreens assists hospitals in identifying high-risk patients upon admission and providing services that reinforce a physician’s care plan. Walgreens clinicians work with patients post-hospital discharge to reinforce the care plan as prescribed, educate on the importance of medication adherence and encourage physician follow-up. Additional services offered include delivery of medications bedside and alignment of discharge medications.

What can Home Health Agencies Learn from the Walgreens Program?

There are a few key takeaways for Home Health agencies coming from the Walgreens WellTransitions® program:

  • There is a real market opportunity here.  The Walgreens article quantifies a $25B annual cost associated with avoidable readmissions and claims that Medicare alone spends $12B in this area.  Now that Medicare is fining hospitals ($288M in 2013 and growing) there is a financial incentive for hospitals to want to partner with organizations who can help reduce these costs.
  • Walgreens has expanded their market to seize this opportunity.   They possessed a critical skill in the form of pharmacists, and were willing to develop a program requiring additional skills in order to compete for a slice of this pie
  • Home Health agencies are extremely well suited to be key players in this market.  Arguably, Home Health agencies possess all of the skills needed for managing care transitions (care planning and delivery skills, med knowledge, care knowledge, mobility, and more) but they are losing the opportunity to  competition that is less well suited (such as pharmacists who don’t generally have the care planning and delivery skills, and hospital care coordination programs that generally don’t have the mobility for home visits).

The Bottom Line:

There is a market for managing post-acute care transitions and avoiding 30 day readmissions.  It’s a large and attractive enough market that Walgreens was interested in going for it.  The 30-day readmission opportunity is only the proverbial tip of the iceberg; with a much larger opportunity to provide “admission avoidance” services to the 5 percent of the population who consume 45% of health care spending.

To learn more about running a care transitions business, click below to see a two-minute overview video.

Care Transitions Video

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Readmissions, Care Coordination, transitional care, Care Transitions

Care Transitions Must-Read: Raising the Bar for Elderly Care At Home

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 13, 2014 5:27:00 PM

I generally read fifteen to twenty articles about advancements in elderly care each week, then I choose the two that I believe will be most interesting to the Ankota blog audience (mostly home health and home care professionals interested in care transitions).  Knowing that not all readers will have time to read the full articles, I summarize certain articles while trying to answer three questions: WHAT?  SO WHAT?  And, NOW WHAT? 

Every now and again though, I come across an article that I feel is a "must read" in its entirety...and that’s the case with today.  The article, featured in the OP-ED section of US NEWS and WORLD REPORT and written by IBM’s Director of Product Strategy, Social Program Management, Ronan Rooney paints a clear picture of home based care as the optimal choice for the elderly.  Please read and enjoy!

US News and World Report

Raising the Bar For Elderly Care at Home

As the country's elderly population increases, health care providers face new challenges.

Thanks to decades of advancements in medicine, humans have a longer life expectancy than ever before. Consider that the oldest living person today – Misawo Okawa at 116 years old – was not expected to see her 45th birthday whenElderly Care Raise the Bar US News she was born in 1898. While super-centenarians like Okawa are rare, people in the United States can expect to live an average of 78.7 years, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development – good news to be sure, but it also presents new challenges in how we provide care to the elderly.

Nursing homes and assisted living centers still serve an important role; however, they meet the needs of just a small subset of the world’s aging population. Increasingly, the elderly are opting to be cared for at home, preferring their own surroundings instead of outside environments. This is sparking a renewed debate on the merits and challenges of home care versus third-party care. Many believe home care is the optimal choice, as it can be tailored to individual circumstances such as family support, social connections, physical space and access to programs and services.

Each aspect of an individual’s living situation and care requirements should determine the delivery model based on a strong understanding of the strengths, barriers and needs of the unique individual. A more holistic approach to elderly care facilitates coordinated, proactive and preventive measures in which those being cared for are regularly monitored for adherence to prescribed medications, physical therapy or dietary restrictions. With the right home care protocols, people are more likely to take an active role managing their own treatment plans for better health, rather than just react to situations that may arise. This can help keep them healthy at home while reducing costly hospital trips.

With home care, multiple agencies must collaborate to ensure that they have a complete profile of each individual. For the first time, technology is enabling team-based care coordination for aging populations in their homes. As organizations look for better ways to meet public needs, big data and advanced analytics have emerged as a way for care providers to drive better outcomes for their elderly patients. In tandem with improved information sharing among care providers and hospital-quality in-home monitoring systems, the elderly and their families can feel more secure in their home care decisions.

For example, the Region of Southern Denmark recently shifted to a standardized platform for monitoring patients so that physicians, pharmacists and specialists can provide holistic care based on unique individual needs. This connected platform enables more effective data analysis across the care continuum and betterIBM Healthcare Strategy patient status tracking as the individual transitions from the hospital to the home. Aided by a more thorough understanding of the care the patient has received, providers can better ensure that individuals are receiving the most effective treatment and taking appropriate measures to ensure wellness at home.

When opting for home care, one common concern is that in the event of an emergency, a loved one will be unable to call for help. Part of developing a home care plan is to mitigate these concerns without hindering the sense of independence. This delicate balance is achievable through the use of non-invasive sensors to collect data and identify abnormalities in patient behavior. If an anomaly is detected – for example, no movement in the resident’s house or deviations from the resident’s usual schedule – the system can alert social services, nurses or other emergency contacts. The sensors serve a preventive function as they can detect abnormalities early on, and are also a means of providing the comfort and independence many elderly people desire without sacrificing safety.

These technologies are also in use in other segments of our society, including pediatric care. Boston Children’s Hospital, for example, just launched a new cloud-based solution called Open Pediatrics, which allows thousands of physicians across 80 countries and six continents to connect, collaborate and share knowledge about treatment options for critically ill children the world over. Similar social learning platforms can be employed for elderly populations, including those geared toward home environments.

With the world’s demographics continuing to change, how we provide care for aging populations has become an important issue. As elderly patients increasingly opt for home care, something that was viewed as a dangerous option only a few years ago, technological advances will continue to play a key role driving better treatment options and care coordination across providers. As population demographics continue to shift, so too should the methods of elderly care, helping people live with dignity in their own homes.


 

white paper describing care transition readmission avoidance opportunity     home care best practices

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Elderly Care, Health Care Reform, Care Coordination, thought leadership, transitional care, home monitoring

Four Challenges for Home Care Start-ups (and How to Overcome Them)

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 9, 2014 8:19:00 PM

In yet another great post from Home Care Consultant Ginny Kenyon, she clearly articluates four challenges for home care start-ups.  The chalenges are enumerated here and more detailed remedies are available in Ginny's full story.

Kenyon Home Care Consulting

Four Key Challenges for Home Care Start-ups

  • Finding Enough Cash: Ginny Estimates the costs from a Home Care start-up at $60,000-$80,000 and for a Home Health start-up from $150,000-$300,000
  • Hiring the Right Staff: Successful start-ups only thrive with the right people for both care delivery and also for managing your office.
  • Getting New Clients: Just last week, we posted a piece from Ginny about making your phone ring
  • Having the Right Systems: Here Ginny talks about Policies and Procedures (an area where she has great resources to get you on the right track) and also things like getting the right software.  She has a technology expert on her team who knows many of the packages in the market
If you're a start-up or thinking of starting a home care business, check-out Ginny's Post for great answers and related articles in the areas where you should dig deeper.
Home Care Best Practices CTA resized 600
Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Starting a Home Care Business, Elderly Care, Home Care Blogs

NPR is Singing from the Care Transitions Hymnal: Beth-Israel Boston

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 8, 2014 2:49:00 PM

When I'm in the car, I generally flip the radio between WEEI (Boston sports talk and "The Red Sox Radio Network") and WBUR (Boston's NPR station).  I love listeningBIDMC to a lot of the stories on NPR though I generally find their stories to be pretty far removed from my life and my work.  Some of their stories seem pretty obscure and I wonder how they come up with them, but I'm sure that each story is relevant and special to someone, just like this one is to me.

In a nutshell, the Beth-Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), a top-notch teaching hospital, was one of the over 2,000 hospitals fined for having high rates of readmissions (total fines topped $200 Million).  BIDMC put an initiative in place called the Post Acute Care Transitions (PACT) program.  You can listen to the story by clicking the player below, or read the full article here.

So far, the PACT program has reduced readmissions by 25%.  Beyond the data the story presents, NPR did a nice job showing the perspective of family members and how they felt about their mom's care.

Another angle that the story focuses on is how readmissions are not a reflection on the quality of care inside the hospital (which at BIDMC is excellent) but is instead related to managing the care transition after discharge.  This is something that home health agencies are ideally suited to address.  Ankota has created a 2-minute video the presents the opportunity for managing care transitions.  We also offer a free white paper on the business opportunity offered by starting a care transitions program.  I hope that these will be valuable to your home care agency and to the hospitals in your area.

Care Transitions Video      Care Transitions White Paper

 

Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

 


Topics: Readmissions, Health Care Reform, Care Transitions

Home Care Marketing - Make Your Phone Ring!

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 3, 2014 10:45:00 PM

Home care consultant and my friend, Ginny Kenyon, published a great piece in her blog entitled Home Health Marketing Ideas to Make Your Agency's Phone Ring.  What IGinny Kenyon Home Care Consulting loved about the article is that it reminds us of the many ways that we can market to our customers.

I strongly encourage you to read the full article because of the rich detail she provides in the context of home care marketing.  But to give you a bit of a teaser, here are some of the approaches that she highlights:

  • Hold an Open House
  • Specialize and Advertise in a way that shows how you are different
  • Educate with you Blog (see related article here)
  • Speak and Write
  • Get Social (both live in the community and via social media)
  • Speak and Write
  • Use your News
The ultimate goal is for your agency to win referrals via word of mouth.  But while you're focusing on building your business, this isn't always easy.  That said, I do believe that it's important to use every tool you have available, and Ginny's article has a number of ideas you may not have yet utilized.  Take a look it and Happy Marketing!  
 
Click on the image below for a free paper entitled The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Home Care Agencies"
Home Care Best Practices
 
Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Home Care Entrepreneurship, Marketing Home Care, Home Care Best Practices

Home Health Should Keep the Elderly out of the Emergency Room

Posted by Ken Accardi on Apr 1, 2014 2:52:00 PM

I came across a great New York Times article that I'd encourage all of you to read, entitled Emergency Rooms are No Place for the Elderly.  My first thought was "Amen," but until I read the article in detail, I didn't realize that I had some of the wrong reasons in mind.  My first thoughts were that the Emergency Room is a bad place forHome Health Avoid ER for the Elderly the elderly because of the following:

  • If they're not urgent, they're likely to wait a very long time
  • They'll be in a waiting area that won't necessarily be comfortable or at the right temperature for them
  • They'll be surrounded by all sorts of sick people and, as such, succeptible to getting sicker, and
  • ER care is very expensive

ER Care is Not Optimized for the Elderly

I don't think that any of my above assertions are incorrect, but the article focused on the way that ER care is delivered and more specifically how the ER is optimized for speed, whereas the best care for the elderly requires patience.
Please read the full article, but here were some of my key takeaways:
  • Elderly care needs in the next 40 years are likely to double for patients over 65 and to triple for patients over 85
  • ER staff are not well trained in setting up the follow-up care (post discharge) that an elderly person is likely to need
  • The "need for speed" in the ER is justified because of the impact on speed for treating stroke, heart attack and traumatic injury, however this is the opposite of what is needed to diagnose and treat an elderly patient taking many meds and suffering from multiple chronic illnesses
  • The ER environment (noise, lights, bustle) may be overwhelming for elderly patients, especially those with some cognitive impairment
  • There's hope.  Evidence based guidelines are being published and starting to be adopted.

The Case for Home Health in Population Health Management

At Ankota, we strongly embrace the concept of population health management, and that when people either become expensive to care for, or have the demographics that are likely to make them expensive to care for, that they should become eligible for ongoing care management.  
We believe that home health agencies are best suited to provide this care because they have the right skills and the resources to deal with concerns (more specifically, they can send nurses or aides to the home as needed).  We've recently released software for managing this kind of care and we're getting a lot of interest, however, we're also being given feedback that in numerous cases the hospitals are doing it themsleves and only via phone.

Keep the Faith!

If your Home Health Agency is having trouble getting customers for care transition programs, Keep the Faith:
  • If there's a group of nurses in the hospital providing telephonic care for at risk patients, get to know them.  They are likely to agree that adding home health services, even if on an as needed basis will assist in avoiding admissions
  • Talk to the discharge people and make sure that they're aware of the importance of at least one home visit to make sure that the home is safe and that the patient knows how to take their meds.
  • Remember that we're still at the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the aging population.
If you'd like to learn more about the opportunity for care transitions managment in Home Health, please watch the two minute video below:
Care Transitions Video
Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

Topics: Readmissions, Elderly Care, Care Transitions

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Ankota provides software to improve the delivery of care outside the hospital, focusing on efficiency and care coordination. Ankota's primary focus is on Care Transitions for Reeadmisison avoidance and on management of Private Duty non-medical home care. To learn more, please visit www.ankota.com or contact Ankota.

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